Heliskier Back on His Game

Heliskier%20-%20%2008-18-13%20-%20R06%20-%20CBY%20-%20Inside%20FinishHorse racing has more than its share of stories that tug at the heartstrings, bring tears to your eyes and leave otherwise stout human beings weak in the knees. It doesn’t take million dollar colts and fillies or regally-bred champions, either. When you’ve invested much of what you have – even in an expensive claimer – the stories can be just as heartrending as those attached to the big-money horses.

Horse racing is more about the little guy and his horses, anyway, since they are the backbone of the sport and outnumber the elite by a considerable number. They are the middle class of the game.

So it was that on a splendid Sunday afternoon that the turnout at Canterbury Park, at least those with their fingers on the pulse of local racing, found plenty to celebrate.

They didn’t have to wait long, either. The good stuff started in race one.

Want something to bring out the compassion?

Try this: with the meet swiftly winding down and all but over for the quarter horses, a trainer with a hard-luck story that gives the genre new meaning sent out the winner in a $16,000 stake. Sammi Santanna, ridden by Rusty Shaw and trained by Randy Weidner picked up first place money. It is a certainty the money will be well spent. Weidner’s stable was wiped out in Oklahoma this spring by a tornado. The native of Rosemount has fought his way back during the Canterbury meet from that devastating incident.

How about a truly feel-good story, one about a cherished horse fallen on hard times that fights back and looks like his former self?

Look no further than Sunday’s sixth race and the 2012 Horse of the Year, Heliskier.

Unbeaten with a 7-0 record through last May, Heliskier was vanned off the track in his second start of the summer after stumbling badly at the start and finishing last and ran second his last time out. Now, about to make his first start since July 20, Heliskier had a new rider, Justin Shepherd, for the first time in his career. Regular rider Derek Bell was injured, not severely, during a workout earlier in the day and did not ride Sunday.

Not to worry, Shepherd took the star of the Colvin stable straight to the winner’s circle, winning with daylight to spare.

“I knew he was back on Friday,” said owner Marlene Colvin. “(Trainer) Mac (Robertson) gave me two thumbs up.”

Was Shepherd concerned?

“I told Marlene that he was too much horse for me to mess up,” he responded.

“He had it his way today.”

Prefer a tale for your tender father-son side?

Well, jockey Nik Goodwin, who had a productive weekend on the racetrack, was bound for his home in Ocala, Fla., immediately after the races. He wanted to be there on Monday morning when his five-year-old son, Lane, leaves for his first day of kindergarten.

Would Goodwin remain stoical in the face of such an occasion? Jockey room custodian Jerry Simmons tried to prepare him just in case. “I’m not an emotional person,” Simmons said. “And I thought I’d be just fine walking my daughter down the isle,” he said. “But it all took me by surprise and…”

For a final happy story of the day, the tale of jockeys Rusty Shaw and Patricia Trimble, husband and wife, was a perfect finish.

Shaw, of course, rode the winner for Weidner in race one, his only mount of the day. Patricia rode Ridgestone, her only mount on the card and the winner of race five, for Harvey and Susan Berg.

As Shaw waited outside the winner’s circle to congratulate his wife, a bystander shouted: “Hey, that’s the way to go about it. Ride one, win one,” he said. “Ride less, win more.”

The philosophic concept sounded just fine to Trimble. “I’d rather ride one and win one than ride seven and not win,” she said.

This blog was written by Canterbury Staff Writer Jim Wells. Wells was a longtime sportswriter at the Pioneer Press and is a member of the Canterbury Park Hall of Fame.

Feel Good Story Caps Weekend

TCF  Captain  Call  Minnesota  Stallion  Breeders  Futurity 06-23-13 R-08  CBY InsideFeel good stories abound at any racetrack. Stories about horses winning with limited vision, maybe a single working eye. Stories about horses rebounding from near-death experiences with winning efforts, horses with names dedicated to a dying patron or trainer coming through in his memory.

But how about this one: A husband-wife training team partnering up with a husband-wife riding tandem to win two races.

That’s right – and it happened on Sunday’s card.

Patricia Trimble and Rusty Shaw were married at Turf Paradise in Phoenix two years ago. Sunday they rode winning horses for Harvey Berg, who trains horses in his wife Susan’s name.

Shaw rode the first winner on the card, a 3-year-old named Dalbo. Trimble brought in Amazingly Karen in the fifth race.

The Bergs also started Ridgeofstone, ridden by Trimble in race six. She ran fourth in that race.

“That’s three-fourths of our entire barn right there,” said Susan Berg. “The fourth is Caring Karen and she’ll run on Thursday’s card.”

Rusty had been named on Ridgeofstone to start. “Patricia was whining about how she wanted to ride the horse,” he joshed. “So I went to Harvey and he didn’t care which one of us rode the horse, so I told my agent to take me off and put Patricia on.”

The Bergs are from Milltown, Wis., and have been racing since they were married 55 years ago. They had horses at Canterbury when the track opened in 1985, left when Canterbury closed in the early 90s and have been back for several years. Racing extends throughout the family. Their daughter, Kari Watson, is an outrider at Remington Park.

There is nothing like racing they insist, for people who like it. Even the traveling has been OK with them. “You know people wherever you go,” Susan said.

Shaw and Trimble showed up at the Bergs’ barn on Sunday morning prepared to gallop, but the track was closed because of its wet condition. Instead, they pitched in and mucked stalls. The Bergs have a small operation and handle the barn on their own.

“I’m happy for them,” said Shaw. “They’re very nice people. I don’t think I’ve ever seen Harvey mad. He just doesn’t get mad about anything.”

There was one problem, however. The Bergs don’t have employees to share with when Shaw and Trimble deliver the doughnuts this week.

It is traditional for a winning jockey to bring the barn a dozen doughnuts for each win. “I don’t think the two of them can eat 24 doughnuts,” Rusty said. “We’ll have to bring them a box at a time.”

MINNESOTA STALLION BREEDERS’ FUTURITY

A jockey walked into the paddock before the eighth race on Sunday and announced: “This is the Bob Johnson Futurity.”

No it wasn’t, even with six starters in the nine-horse race.

“His mistake today was only six starters, instead of nine,” a wise-cracker offered.

It was the Brent Clay-John Lawless stakes as it turned out, with TCF Captain Call (pictured at top), Stormy Smith up, claiming the winner’s circle in 18.245.

Lawless and his wife made the three-hour drive north from Eldora, Iowa, for the race, a bit of drive that was cushioned by a purse worth $39,000.

“It seems like 10 minutes now,” said Lawless, who raced at Canterbury up until about three years ago and was attracted back by the increased purses.

“This is a great facility and now with the purses it’s even better,” he said.

His chief concern Sunday was TCF’s frame of mind. “He’s moody,” Lawless said “Nothing serious but he does get moody.”

Enough so that if affects his effort.

There was none of that on Sunday as TCF surged to a half length win over Tucan Sam. Third was Just Beach and fourth, Johnson’s It’s A Royal Flush.

This blog was written by Canterbury Staff Writer Jim Wells. Wells was a longtime sportswriter at the Pioneer Press and is a member of the Canterbury Park Hall of Fame.

Canterbury Jockeys Make Plans

Some of the trailers are lined up like sentries on the backside, ready to receive their cargo when the meet officially closes on Monday. They have been swept out and lined with fresh straw in anticipation of the awaiting trip, to farms where their cargo will be turned out or to other racetracks where they will be assigned new stalls.

The men and women who have ridden those horses this summer in Shakopee are making plans as well, preparing to take short breaks before engaging in a new meet at another racetrack, in Chicago, Oklahoma or in Phoenix.

Many of the riders who spend their winters riding at Turf Paradise in Phoenix shift their tack to Shakopee in the spring because the two meets dovetail perfectly.

Scott Stevens, for one, is heading home to Phoenix for the first time in the last four years prepared to ride when Turf Paradise begins its meet the first week of October. This is the first Canterbury meet in four years Stevens has been able to complete, and it was a good meet at that. Through Friday’s card he has ridden 27 winners.

Now it’s on to Phoenix.

“I’m anxious for that,” he said. “It’s been a while.” Stevens has been either injured, undergoing therapy or awaiting surgery and unable to ride when the Phoenix meet began for the last three autumns.

But first there is a scheduled trip. “I’m going for a week to Hawaii,” he said.

Sounds great, but it is hard to match the journey Lori Keith plans to take before dusting off her tack for the Phoenix meet. She’s planning on a respite in the South of France where her parents have a restaurant. “For some good food, good wine and fine company,” she said.

And then there is the sad tale of Canterbury Park’s 2012 riding champion, Tanner Riggs, who struggles to maintain his riding weight and is best off staying busy rather than taking a break.

“I think I’ll catch the last three weeks of Arlington and then go to Hawthorne,” he said.

Not much of a vacation, he was told.

“Can’t really take one,” he responded.

Patricia Trimble heads out on Wednesday with her husband, Rusty Shaw, who has spent the summer on injured reserve and is still awaiting surgery. Her five-year-old daughter, Taylor Page, is beginning kindergarten, at a school not far from Turf Paradise.

Nik Goodwin, the 2012 quarter horse riding champion, is headed to Ocala, Fla., where he intends to spend the next few months breaking babies. But first he and his wife will take a trip to Yellowstone National Park, while the boys, four-year-old Layne and one-year-old Hunter, spend some time with grandpa and grandma in Bemidji. “We’re going to fly them up to spend time with my parents,” Goodwin said.

Bobby Walker, Jr. will head home to West Monroe, La. His son Aaron, 13, will begin the eighth grade in either West Monroe or Bossier City. The uncertainty has to do with Walker’s daughter Brittany, a radiology technician, who has agreed to help out if Aaron goes to school in Bossier City where she lives.

Wilson Dieguez will head home to Phoenix, too, for his 12th season at Turf Paradise. He intends to return to Shakopee for a second time next spring. “I’ll be back, for sure, God willing,” he said.

Derek Bell will take a five-day trip to Canada to angle for walleyes but intends to see if he’ll be allowed to ride at Arlington Park, now that the “flag” on his name has been eliminated.

Carlos Castro is bound for Charles Town for three or four weeks and later will give Hawthore a shot.

Adolfo Morales?

He’s a Phoenix native, who’ll take some time off and “gain some weight,” he said facetiously.

Dean Butler, who is likely to finish second this season in the standings after winning three consecutive titles at Canterbury, hasn’t taken any time off since he started in 1992. “If I get days or something,” he said. “Or sick.”

So, it’s off to Remington Park and then home to Tampa Bay Downs for the winter.

About that time, Stevens look up at a television in the jockeys’ lounge with the horses for the fourth race Thursday night parading in front of the grandstand.”Hey, that’s the horse that broke my shoulder last summer,” he said, referring to Proud Kylean, who had Geovanni Franco on her back.

Another reminder for Stevens that it’s been a good summer indeed.

This blog was written by Canterbury Staff Writer Jim Wells. Wells was a longtime sportswriter at the Pioneer Press and is a member of the Canterbury Park Hall of Fame.

Photo Credit: Coady Photography

Canterbury Jockeys Make Plans

Some of the trailers are lined up like sentries on the backside, ready to receive their cargo when the meet officially closes on Monday. They have been swept out and lined with fresh straw in anticipation of the awaiting trip, to farms where their cargo will be turned out or to other racetracks where they will be assigned new stalls.

The men and women who have ridden those horses this summer in Shakopee are making plans as well, preparing to take short breaks before engaging in a new meet at another racetrack, in Chicago, Oklahoma or in Phoenix.

Many of the riders who spend their winters riding at Turf Paradise in Phoenix shift their tack to Shakopee in the spring because the two meets dovetail perfectly.

Scott Stevens, for one, is heading home to Phoenix for the first time in the last four years prepared to ride when Turf Paradise begins its meet the first week of October. This is the first Canterbury meet in four years Stevens has been able to complete, and it was a good meet at that. Through Friday’s card he has ridden 27 winners.

Now it’s on to Phoenix.

“I’m anxious for that,” he said. “It’s been a while.” Stevens has been either injured, undergoing therapy or awaiting surgery and unable to ride when the Phoenix meet began for the last three autumns.

But first there is a scheduled trip. “I’m going for a week to Hawaii,” he said.

Sounds great, but it is hard to match the journey Lori Keith plans to take before dusting off her tack for the Phoenix meet. She’s planning on a respite in the South of France where her parents have a restaurant. “For some good food, good wine and fine company,” she said.

And then there is the sad tale of Canterbury Park’s 2012 riding champion, Tanner Riggs, who struggles to maintain his riding weight and is best off staying busy rather than taking a break.

“I think I’ll catch the last three weeks of Arlington and then go to Hawthorne,” he said.

Not much of a vacation, he was told.

“Can’t really take one,” he responded.

Patricia Trimble heads out on Wednesday with her husband, Rusty Shaw, who has spent the summer on injured reserve and is still awaiting surgery. Her five-year-old daughter, Taylor Page, is beginning kindergarten, at a school not far from Turf Paradise.

Nik Goodwin, the 2012 quarter horse riding champion, is headed to Ocala, Fla., where he intends to spend the next few months breaking babies. But first he and his wife will take a trip to Yellowstone National Park, while the boys, four-year-old Layne and one-year-old Hunter, spend some time with grandpa and grandma in Bemidji. “We’re going to fly them up to spend time with my parents,” Goodwin said.

Bobby Walker, Jr. will head home to West Monroe, La. His son Aaron, 13, will begin the eighth grade in either West Monroe or Bossier City. The uncertainty has to do with Walker’s daughter Brittany, a radiology technician, who has agreed to help out if Aaron goes to school in Bossier City where she lives.

Wilson Dieguez will head home to Phoenix, too, for his 12th season at Turf Paradise. He intends to return to Shakopee for a second time next spring. “I’ll be back, for sure, God willing,” he said.

Derek Bell will take a five-day trip to Canada to angle for walleyes but intends to see if he’ll be allowed to ride at Arlington Park, now that the “flag” on his name has been eliminated.

Carlos Castro is bound for Charles Town for three or four weeks and later will give Hawthore a shot.

Adolfo Morales?

He’s a Phoenix native, who’ll take some time off and “gain some weight,” he said facetiously.

Dean Butler, who is likely to finish second this season in the standings after winning three consecutive titles at Canterbury, hasn’t taken any time off since he started in 1992. “If I get days or something,” he said. “Or sick.”

So, it’s off to Remington Park and then home to Tampa Bay Downs for the winter.

About that time, Stevens look up at a television in the jockeys’ lounge with the horses for the fourth race Thursday night parading in front of the grandstand.”Hey, that’s the horse that broke my shoulder last summer,” he said, referring to Proud Kylean, who had Geovanni Franco on her back.

Another reminder for Stevens that it’s been a good summer indeed.

This blog was written by Canterbury Staff Writer Jim Wells. Wells was a longtime sportswriter at the Pioneer Press and is a member of the Canterbury Park Hall of Fame.

Photo Credit: Coady Photography

Patriate Claims the Crown

Bob Johnson left no doubt about his thoughts on the Claiming Series Thursday night as he considered it in the paddock minutes before post time for the championship race.

“I like this,” he said. “I like it a lot. I hope they have a lot more of them.”

Rival trainer Mike Biehler could understand the sentiment perfectly, as it applied to Johnson.

“Yeah, and he’ll probably like it a whole lot more in a few minutes,” Biehler said.

Johnson appeared to suppress a wry grin as he gave Patricia Trimble a leg up on Patriate, who already had three gate-to-wire wins this summer and had won two of three qualifying races for the championship, beating every one of his Thursday night rivals in the process.

He had good reason to like the series, and, just as Biehler forecast, hadn’t changed his mind in the least a few minutes later after the seven-year-old gelding went gate to wire once more, finishing 2 ½ lengths in front of Brokenandbusted, who had a neck on French Moon.

Patriate claimed the winner’s share of the $25,000 championship purse, a very significant reason for liking this concept since Johnson not only trains the winner but owns him also. Thus he didn’t have to share the $15,000 winner’s check with someone doling out day money.

 

Brokeandbusted, owned by Tom and Karen Metzen and Gary McCloud and trained by Biehler collected a check for $5,000 and a $3,000 check went to French Moon, trained by Valorie Lund and owned by Zephyr Stable.

Winning time for the race was 1:05 and 4/5, after a :46 and 2/5 half mile and :22 and 2/5 for the quarter mile.

“I love this old guy,” Trimble said afterward. “He earned all his money the hard way.”

Previously, Patriate had earned $81,849 with a record of 14-14-4 from 52 career starts.

Pressbox manager Jeff Maday and assistant Andrew Offerman devised the rules for the series (there was one for fillies and mares that concluded last week) last winter after being inspired by a similar concept at Portland Meadows.

With only six horses lined up for the championship race Thursday, the idea did not match their expectations.

The biggest reason, both agreed, was probably lack of education, a point embraced by Biehler, who said he did not understand the entire concept early on.

Track president/CEO Randy Sampson also pointed out that the idea was formulated before the addition of supplements from the Mystic Lake agreement that enhanced purses significantly.

Still, Offerman, for one, was not totally discouraged. “This is the type of racetrack where this kind of thing has a chance to be very successful,” he said. “We’re a little disappointed in the number of horses participating this year, but it has an opportunity to grow. It’s a fantastic opportunity to get people interested in owning a horse.”

The idea, of course, is that someone can claim a horse for $3,500 and within four to five weeks have the opportunity to run for $25,000 or more.

Bob Johnson might be a good one with whom to discuss that very possibility.

For more information on the Canterbury Claiming Series, and for complete standings, check out the Canterbury Park webpage.

The 2012 Canterbury Claiming Series is sponsored by Continental Diamond.

This blog was written by Canterbury Staff Writer Jim Wells. Wells was a longtime sportswriter at the Pioneer Press and is a member of the Canterbury Park Hall of Fame.

Photo Credit: Coady Photography

Two of a Kind

They dressed for the wedding in the jockeys’ room, and then piled in the back of a pickup truck for the trip to the Turf Paradise garden where the ceremony was held.

The men were duded up in western hats and jackets, the perfect ensemble for the place and setting. The bride stayed more traditional with a white dress, although she did wear her western boots.

Twenty minutes later, Patricia Trimble and Rusty Shaw were man and wife, although the ceremony was delayed.

Trimble, it seems, had a late mount that day, and it does take the bride a bit longer to prepare – under any circumstances. “Patricia was about an hour late,” Shaw said. “But there was no way we were going to start without her.”

The date is a simple matter to recall. The wedding took place on 11-11-11.

Trimble raced at Canterbury Park last summer for the first time. She had been to Shakopee once before with a mount in the 2010 Claiming Crown. “But my horse was scratched,” she said. When Shaw made plans for Shakopee along with trainer Valorie Lund last summer, Trimble decided to try Minnesota too.

She and Shaw had met maybe 10 years prior in Florida at a two-year-old sale. Shaw introduced her to a friend of his who became her partner for several years. When that relationship ended, Shaw and Trimble began theirs.

Now the union has taken on an entirely new dimension. Shaw lost the entire summer in the saddle after an incident on May 2 with a two-year-old left him with a broken arm, a dislocated shoulder and torn rotator cuff muscle. “It’s still real sore. I’m going to have surgery in a week or two,” he said Friday.

In the meantime, it made no sense for Trimble to pay agent fees when her husband was not working. Shaw took over as his wife’s agent and will continue in that capacity for the remainder of the meet.

“I plan to go back to riding but it will be another three to four months,” he said.

Trimble took advantage of the moment. “I just wish he’d get me some livelier mounts,” she said.

So, how is the new job?

“I totally don’t like it,” Shaw said. “But it does help the family situation. And it does get me talking to people a bit more. I was never an outspoken guy, but I’m learning.”

Meanwhile, Patricia carries the family load, and is having what she calls a “decent meet.” She started Friday’s card with 11 wins, nine seconds and nine thirds from 88 mounts for total earnings of $122,631

Trimble is a Vancouver, British Columbia native and began riding in 1998 at Woodbine. She got her first winner at Hastings and then rode at Fort Erie, Mountaineer, Great Lakes and Tampa Bay Downs..

She and Shaw plan to return to Turf Paradise for at least another meet since they have a home in Phoenix.

With the Mystic Lake agreement dramatically improving the financial picture for the state horse industry, Trimble and Shaw expect to return to Shakopee for the foreseeable future.

Shaw is enthralled with the agreement. “It’s awesome,” he said. “I think it’s going to help this track a lot. It will be booming in a couple of years. I can’t wait to come back here and ride next year.”

His partner has similar plans, of course.

“I’ll come back for sure,” Trimble said. “I just wish the meet were longer, but I love Minnesota.”

Last 11-11-11 was a day to love, too, although it took place about 1,600 miles from Canterbury Park. It was the first marriage for the bride and the groom. Trimble designated her sister, Tara, her best friend from Vancouver, trainer Terry Clyde, and her riding colleague, Lori Keith, as her maids of honor.

Shaw was accompanied by his brother, Aaron, rider Jake Barton and Brian Brock, a groom for Lund. The wedding went off a bit late but just as planned. Dinner and dancing followed at the track.

“The whole thing was fantastic,” Keith recalled. The champagne flowed and before the night was over everybody was on the dance floor.”

Well, they better have been.

“Yeah, that whole thing was a bit tough on the pocket book,” Shaw said.

This blog was written by Canterbury Staff Writer Jim Wells. Wells was a longtime sportswriter at the Pioneer Press and is a member of the Canterbury Park Hall of Fame.

Photo Credit: Coady Photography

Patriate Does it Again!

The Colt & Gelding Division of Canterbury’s 2012 Claiming Series continued last night with the second of three qualifying races. Patriate and jockey Patricia Trimble didn’t figure to get as easy of a lead this time around but it turns out they had little trouble jumping on the field and putting them away taking them gate to wire.

Through the second race for colts and geldings, here’s a breakdown of the leading male point earners in the 2012 Claiming Series:

Patriate – 16 Points
French Moon – 14 Points
Flaming Glory – 9 Points
Vinny V.- 9 Points
Timetobook – 6 Points
Brokeandbusted – 5 Points
Forener – 4 Points
Local Big Shot – 3 Point

The top 12 point earners will qualify for a $25,000 Championship Race which will be held for Colts and Geldings on August 9.

Two claims were dropped on post time favorite Brokeandbusted. Mike Biehler ended up winning the shake for Tom & Karen Metzen and Gary McCloud. They have now claimed both Brokeandbusted and Boneafide Cat out of claiming series races.

Fillies and Mares get their final chance to earn points next Thursday. Entries will be taken tomorrow.

Look for many of these colts and geldings to run back two weeks from yesterday on Thursday, July 19 as they will continue to try to earn points to qualify for the August 9 Championship.

For more information on the Canterbury Claiming Series, and for complete standings, check out the Canterbury Park webpage.

The 2012 Canterbury Claiming Series is sponsored by Continental Diamond.

This blog was written by Canterbury Park’s Live Racing and Digital Media Coordinator Andrew Offerman. Offerman has served in this role since returning to Minnesota in 2010 after earning his Master’s Degree from the University of Arizona’s Race Track Industry Program.

Patriate Does it Again!

The Colt & Gelding Division of Canterbury’s 2012 Claiming Series continued last night with the second of three qualifying races. Patriate and jockey Patricia Trimble didn’t figure to get as easy of a lead this time around but it turns out they had little trouble jumping on the field and putting them away taking them gate to wire.

Through the second race for colts and geldings, here’s a breakdown of the leading male point earners in the 2012 Claiming Series:

Patriate – 16 Points
French Moon – 14 Points
Flaming Glory – 9 Points
Vinny V.- 9 Points
Timetobook – 6 Points
Brokeandbusted – 5 Points
Forener – 4 Points
Local Big Shot – 3 Point

The top 12 point earners will qualify for a $25,000 Championship Race which will be held for Colts and Geldings on August 9.

Two claims were dropped on post time favorite Brokeandbusted. Mike Biehler ended up winning the shake for Tom & Karen Metzen and Gary McCloud. They have now claimed both Brokeandbusted and Boneafide Cat out of claiming series races.

Fillies and Mares get their final chance to earn points next Thursday. Entries will be taken tomorrow.

Look for many of these colts and geldings to run back two weeks from yesterday on Thursday, July 19 as they will continue to try to earn points to qualify for the August 9 Championship.

For more information on the Canterbury Claiming Series, and for complete standings, check out the Canterbury Park webpage.

The 2012 Canterbury Claiming Series is sponsored by Continental Diamond.

This blog was written by Canterbury Park’s Live Racing and Digital Media Coordinator Andrew Offerman. Offerman has served in this role since returning to Minnesota in 2010 after earning his Master’s Degree from the University of Arizona’s Race Track Industry Program.

Patriate Gains Command

The Colt & Gelding Division of Canterbury’s 2012 Claiming Series got underway last night with the first of three qualifying races (the next two are scheduled for July 5 and July 19). Patriate and jockey Patricia Trimble snuck away on a lonely lead and were just able to hold on over a hard charging French Moon who had to settle for second.

Through the first race for colts and geldings, here’s a breakdown of the leading male point earners in the 2012 Claiming Series:

Patriate- 8 Points
French Moon – 7 Points
Flaming Glory – 6 Points
Vinny V.- 5 Points
Forener – 4 Points
Local Big Shot – 3 Points
Perfect Saturday- 2 Points
Afleet Indy- 1 Point

The top 12 point earners will qualify for a $25,000 Championship Race which will be held for Colts and Geldings on August 9.

There was only one claim dropped in the race and that was on the only Minnesota-bred to race in the series thus far, Local Big Shot. P.C. Fauchald made the claim for Jeanette Fauchald. Obviously they must fancy the watch (provided by Continental Diamond) valued at $2,500 that goes to the owner of the leading Minnesota-bred at the end of the series.

Fillies and Mares get their second chance to earn points next Thursday. Entries will be taken tomorrow.

Look for many of these colts and geldings to run back two weeks from yesterday on Thursday, July 5 as they will continue to try to earn points to qualify for the August 9 Championship.

For more information on the Canterbury Claiming Series, and for complete standings, check out the Canterbury Park webpage.

The 2012 Canterbury Claiming Series is sponsored by Continental Diamond.

This blog was written by Canterbury Park’s Live Racing and Digital Media Coordinator Andrew Offerman. Offerman has served in this role since returning to Minnesota in 2010 after earning his Master’s Degree from the University of Arizona’s Race Track Industry Program.

Patriate Gains Command

The Colt & Gelding Division of Canterbury’s 2012 Claiming Series got underway last night with the first of three qualifying races (the next two are scheduled for July 5 and July 19). Patriate and jockey Patricia Trimble snuck away on a lonely lead and were just able to hold on over a hard charging French Moon who had to settle for second.

Through the first race for colts and geldings, here’s a breakdown of the leading male point earners in the 2012 Claiming Series:

Patriate- 8 Points
French Moon – 7 Points
Flaming Glory – 6 Points
Vinny V.- 5 Points
Forener – 4 Points
Local Big Shot – 3 Points
Perfect Saturday- 2 Points
Afleet Indy- 1 Point

The top 12 point earners will qualify for a $25,000 Championship Race which will be held for Colts and Geldings on August 9.

There was only one claim dropped in the race and that was on the only Minnesota-bred to race in the series thus far, Local Big Shot. P.C. Fauchald made the claim for Jeanette Fauchald. Obviously they must fancy the watch (provided by Continental Diamond) valued at $2,500 that goes to the owner of the leading Minnesota-bred at the end of the series.

Fillies and Mares get their second chance to earn points next Thursday. Entries will be taken tomorrow.

Look for many of these colts and geldings to run back two weeks from yesterday on Thursday, July 5 as they will continue to try to earn points to qualify for the August 9 Championship.

For more information on the Canterbury Claiming Series, and for complete standings, check out the Canterbury Park webpage.

The 2012 Canterbury Claiming Series is sponsored by Continental Diamond.

This blog was written by Canterbury Park’s Live Racing and Digital Media Coordinator Andrew Offerman. Offerman has served in this role since returning to Minnesota in 2010 after earning his Master’s Degree from the University of Arizona’s Race Track Industry Program.