Clean Sweep in Northlands

Eyesa%20Wagon%20Maker%20-%20Mystic%20Lake%20Northlands%20Futurity%20-%2007-05-13%20-%20R09%20-%20CBY%20-%20Inside%20Finish%20The best laid plans of mice and men – and quarter horse trainers – don’t always play out as they’re intended. And sometimes they do… just not as expected.

Let’s call this one the second no contest of the night.

Friday night in the richest quarter horse race in track history, the Mystic Lake Northlands Futurity, a trainer named Stacy Charette-Hill sent out horses that finished one-two-three. And she once raced the dam of the fourth place horse.

The purse was $133,525 (including $27,500 from the Mystic Lake purse enhancement fund). Most of it went to Charette-Hill and her husband, Randy Hill.

The irony here is that the favorite in the race, High Ace, also trained by Charette Hill, finished fifth. And the winner was Eyesa Wagon Maker, sent off at 35-1 under Stormy Smith.

The first no contest on the card occurred in the fifth race when the gate malfunctioned at the break.

For the record, Eyesa Wagon Maker, bred and raised by Stacy and Randy and ridden by Stormy Smith, finished first in 17.76. Next was Mighty Coronas First and then Little PYC. Fourth place went to Fantastic Follies, by PYC Paint Your Wagon, handled by Randy Smith, from Fantastic Six, once raced by the husband and wife team.

Smith was all smiles, having won this race for the third straight year, in 2012 with Midnight Sunlight and in 2011 with Cruzin the Wagon.

Eyesa Wagon Maker lost his concentration at one point during the 350 yard race. “The five horse (Little PYC) was leaning on us just a little and when Omar went to the stick he moved out and my horse took off,” said Smith.

Charette-Hill had four chances to win this race, and the one she least expected came through.

“I didn’t think this horse could win it,” she said. “I really didn’t.”

Charette-Hill qualified five horses for the race and they drew post positions right in order, three through seven. That is until Lil Miss Party Doll was later scratched.

Nonetheless, she still had four starters. “That wouldn’t happen again in a million tries, to draw those spots in order,” she said. “I guess it doesn’t matter, if I get wiped out by anyone it will be my own.”

Charette-Hill took the philosophical approach to the matter before the race, happy to have qualified at all.

“Some didn’t get the opportunity,” she said. “I’m happy to race. It will be fun.”

Mighty Coronas First was the second fastest qualifier for the race, just behind High Ace.

Stacy is still waiting for the filly by Mighty Corona to get her act together. “She can be a basket case,” she said. “I have to do so much with her just to keep her quiet. “I thought she was dead on the ground behind the gates at Remington. I tied her and she wouldn’t stay in the gate. She tried to tear them down. She can put on a real show.”

Nonetheless, she has known the filly had talent from the get-go. “I called my husband and said, I’m telling you Randy Hill, this mare can fly and I mean fly.”

The best might be yet to come. “If she ever gets where she can trust herself and everyone around her and on her, I think she’ll be major fast,” Stacy added.

For Friday night, though, all eyes were on Eyesa Wagon Maker, the winner of the richest quarter horse race in track history.

Eyesa%20Wagon%20Maker%20-%20Mystic%20Lake%20Northlands%20Futurity%20-%2007-05-13%20-%20R09%20-%20CBY%20-%20Pres

THE RACE THAT DIDN’T HAPPEN

The human eye, limited as it is, caught something out or the ordinary in Friday’s fifth race. A slow motion replay clarified the matter. The gates opened in groups at different times, as if it were a staggered start.

Those who missed the break were at first mystified after Tiger Run and Juan Rivera hit the wire in front of the field and a stewards’ inquiry ensued.

It was clear after watching replays that the horses breaks occurred at different times due to the gate malfunction.

The stewards declared a no contest, and wagers were returned to patrons.

NOT JUST THE WEATHER

Alex Canchari, the Minnesota Kid, continued as the track’s hottest rider with another winner on Friday’s card. He had three on Wednesday night that included both $50,000 stakes races and another winner on Thursday’s card.

Friday, He took Lookinatmindy, trained by clay Brinson, to the winner’s circle in race four.

This blog was written by Canterbury Staff Writer Jim Wells. Wells was a longtime sportswriter at the Pioneer Press and is a member of the Canterbury Park Hall of Fame.

MTA Yearling Sale Shows Substantial Gains

Maybe one item alone will say everything necessary about the Minnesota Thoroughbred Association yearling and mixed sale Saturday evening. Executive director Kay King was almost, not quite, but almost ready to officially declare the sale topper the highest purchase of all-time.

“I’m going to check our records, but I’m almost sure it is,” she said.

The topper was hip No. 6, a dark bay or brown colt by Holy Bull, the 1994 U.S. Horse of the Year, from Run With Joy (Canterbury Park’s 2007 Horse of the Meet) and was purchased for $56,000 by Barry and Joni Butzow.

“He vetted out, was pretty correct and was feisty,” Joni said.

It was the colt’s bottom side that interested Barry. “I don’t care about Holy Bull but look back a couple of generations on the other side,” he said.

Yes, there is a connection to some fine blood on the bottom side as well. Run With Joy is by Ghazi from Unbridled Joy, who is by Unbridled, the 1990 Kentucky Derby and Breeders’ Cup Classic winner and three-year-old colt of the year.

The $56,000 colt was consigned by Oak Tree Farm as agent for Raymond and Karen Wheeler.

The transaction itself was a shot in the arm for an industry that has struggled and suffered from a lack of optimism and enthusiasm.

There was nothing of the kind this time around; in fact, it was quite the reverse, due largely, of course, to the marketing deal struck between Canterbury Park and Mystic Lake.

“It was amazing,” said King. “First of all because of a renewed energy; you could feel it from the consignors and the purchasers. Everyone seemed hopeful now that there is a future. People can recognize that. There is something worth running for.”

Hip No. 13, a dark bay or brown gelding by Orientate from Star Crusader, was purchased for$31,000 by Jim Thares from Kim Heytens and Kimberly Meadows.

Next on the list was a $25,000 purchased by Kenneth Larson from Wood-Mere Farm, LLC, a dark bay or brown filly by Orientate from Miners Mirage.

There was a $22,500 purchase, a gray or roan filly by Monarchos from Harmony Found, by Anthony Didier from Wood-Mere Farm, LLC, agent for Irish Rose Racing, LLC.

All of that had King in a much better mood than on the mornings after recent sales. “It’s so much more fun doing the results this morning than especially two years ago,” she said.

In 2010, the average sale price was $4,959 and the median was $2,600 on the sale of 17 horses for a total of $84,300.

Those figures improved last year with an average price of $6,403 with a median of $3,000. The gross on 31 horses sold was $198,500.

Now take a look at 2012:

The average was $10,332, the median was $5,500 and the gross on 31 horses was $320,300 – an increase of over 60% from 2011 and an increase of nearly 280% compared to 2010.

Twenty-six Minnesota-breds sold for an average of $11,754. Also in the sale were four Kentucky-breds and an Ontario-bred.

King made other observations that suggested a larger, maybe more diversified market.

“It’s interesting because there were many new faces, people we hadn’t sold to before and also people we haven’t sold to in quite a while. That was reassuring as well.”

King envisions her role as a cheerleader for such functions. “From the time we set the date and sent out the consignment forms to everyone with Minnesota-bred yearlings it’s my job to pull out the pom poms and be the cheerleader no matter how bad things have been the last couple of years.”

Her job, she said, was a lot easier this year. She was selling some reality instead of a roll of the dice.

This blog was written by Canterbury Staff Writer Jim Wells. Wells was a longtime sportswriter at the Pioneer Press and is a member of the Canterbury Park Hall of Fame.

Photo Credit: Coady Photography

MTA Yearling Sale Shows Substantial Gains

Maybe one item alone will say everything necessary about the Minnesota Thoroughbred Association yearling and mixed sale Saturday evening. Executive director Kay King was almost, not quite, but almost ready to officially declare the sale topper the highest purchase of all-time.

“I’m going to check our records, but I’m almost sure it is,” she said.

The topper was hip No. 6, a dark bay or brown colt by Holy Bull, the 1994 U.S. Horse of the Year, from Run With Joy (Canterbury Park’s 2007 Horse of the Meet) and was purchased for $56,000 by Barry and Joni Butzow.

“He vetted out, was pretty correct and was feisty,” Joni said.

It was the colt’s bottom side that interested Barry. “I don’t care about Holy Bull but look back a couple of generations on the other side,” he said.

Yes, there is a connection to some fine blood on the bottom side as well. Run With Joy is by Ghazi from Unbridled Joy, who is by Unbridled, the 1990 Kentucky Derby and Breeders’ Cup Classic winner and three-year-old colt of the year.

The $56,000 colt was consigned by Oak Tree Farm as agent for Raymond and Karen Wheeler.

The transaction itself was a shot in the arm for an industry that has struggled and suffered from a lack of optimism and enthusiasm.

There was nothing of the kind this time around; in fact, it was quite the reverse, due largely, of course, to the marketing deal struck between Canterbury Park and Mystic Lake.

“It was amazing,” said King. “First of all because of a renewed energy; you could feel it from the consignors and the purchasers. Everyone seemed hopeful now that there is a future. People can recognize that. There is something worth running for.”

Hip No. 13, a dark bay or brown gelding by Orientate from Star Crusader, was purchased for$31,000 by Jim Thares from Kim Heytens and Kimberly Meadows.

Next on the list was a $25,000 purchased by Kenneth Larson from Wood-Mere Farm, LLC, a dark bay or brown filly by Orientate from Miners Mirage.

There was a $22,500 purchase, a gray or roan filly by Monarchos from Harmony Found, by Anthony Didier from Wood-Mere Farm, LLC, agent for Irish Rose Racing, LLC.

All of that had King in a much better mood than on the mornings after recent sales. “It’s so much more fun doing the results this morning than especially two years ago,” she said.

In 2010, the average sale price was $4,959 and the median was $2,600 on the sale of 17 horses for a total of $84,300.

Those figures improved last year with an average price of $6,403 with a median of $3,000. The gross on 31 horses sold was $198,500.

Now take a look at 2012:

The average was $10,332, the median was $5,500 and the gross on 31 horses was $320,300 – an increase of over 60% from 2011 and an increase of nearly 280% compared to 2010.

Twenty-six Minnesota-breds sold for an average of $11,754. Also in the sale were four Kentucky-breds and an Ontario-bred.

King made other observations that suggested a larger, maybe more diversified market.

“It’s interesting because there were many new faces, people we hadn’t sold to before and also people we haven’t sold to in quite a while. That was reassuring as well.”

King envisions her role as a cheerleader for such functions. “From the time we set the date and sent out the consignment forms to everyone with Minnesota-bred yearlings it’s my job to pull out the pom poms and be the cheerleader no matter how bad things have been the last couple of years.”

Her job, she said, was a lot easier this year. She was selling some reality instead of a roll of the dice.

This blog was written by Canterbury Staff Writer Jim Wells. Wells was a longtime sportswriter at the Pioneer Press and is a member of the Canterbury Park Hall of Fame.

Photo Credit: Coady Photography