Bodenheimer Pointed To Kentucky Downs; Mr. Jagermeister Out Of Festival

The undefeated 2-year-old colt from the Valorie Lund barn Bodenheimer will be headed to Kentucky Downs to race Sept. 12 in the $250,000 Kentucky Downs Juvenile Turf Sprint at 6 1/2 furlongs. The race drew 48 nominations with Bodenheimer one of the 12 top earners which would secure a spot in the starting gate. The colt began his career July 7 at Canterbury winning a 5 furlong turf maiden by 11 1/4 lengths. Next stop was the $50,000 Prairie Gold Juvenile Stakes on the dirt at Prairie Meadows where he won by a neck.

Mr. Jagermeister Done For The Year

Entries for the Minnesota Festival of Champions will be taken tomorrow but a familiar name will not be found on the overnight. Mr. Jagermeister, also trained by Lund, sprained his hock and will miss the event.  A three-time Festival winner of the ’17 Northern Lights Juvenile, ’18 Classic Championship and ’19 Classic Sprint, the Jag will be missed on the day that highlights the best of the state. “He was due for his next turnout,” Lund said, so the setback made the decision easy. Mr. Jagermeister is already in Kentucky. “I’ll give him 60 to 90 days off.” Race fans will see him next year.

Mr. Jagermeister is in Kentucky because that is where Lund and her stable will spend the fall and winter. Turf Paradise would be the normal location but with the track closed, perhaps forever, many including Lund were left scrambling. Lund made arrangements for space at Ashwood Training Center in Lexington. The facility has 300 stalls, training track, official timed workouts, and turnouts. As horses run their final race at Canterbury Lund will haul them to Kentucky. She already has her first load of six there and when another six are ready she will make another trip.  The location will allow her to ship horses to Kentucky tracks to race but also to others close by like the Ohio tracks. Lund plans for a small string at Oaklawn as well.

Satellite Storm, a Lund turf sprinter, most recently ran at Monmouth after a colossal win at Colonial Downs. When Colonial canceled the meet, Lund and owner Peter Seals looked for options, specifically five furlong turf races. Monmouth was chosen but the effort was lackluster, leaving Lund thinking she may have asked too much of the horse in that period of time. Satellite Storm is now at Ashwood and likely to run at Churchill in the fall.

Sale Topper Hip #43

Lund was also involved in Sunday’s MTA Yearling Auction, consulting with owners Barry and Joni Butzow who purchased the$42,000 sale topper, a Midshipman filly out of Sahm Sweetheart. “We shortlisted five yearlings,” she said. “This one  met all the specs.”

Here are the auction results.

 

Street Sense Colt Tops MTA Yearling Sale

The annual Minnesota Thoroughbred Association Yearling Sale was held Sunday evening in the Canterbury Expo Center with the hammer dropping on the sales topper for $82,000. Forty-eight Minnesota bred yearlings and one Kentucky bred yearling went through the sales ring resulting in gross sales of more than a half-million dollars.

The sale topper was Hip #15, a dark bay/brown Minnesota bred colt by Street Sense out of the mare Cindy’s Hero, a grade 1 winner of $371,975. He was consigned by Dove Hill Farm, acting as agent for Tom Baxter. A bidding battle took place coming down to two players, with Lothenbach Stables making the winning bid.

Dove Hill Farm was the leading consignor at the sale and Lothenbach was the leading purchaser in dollars paid with $127,000 spent on two yearlings. Lothenbach was also winning bidder on Hip #14 for $45,000.

FILLY GOES FOR TOP PRICE AT MTA SALE

MTA_Cover01a

You want a horse, one with potential and the promise of earning back its purchase price and maybe even a nice profit to boot. So what do you look for and how do you know if you’re on the right track?

Well, it’s not much different than scouting ball players in some respects. Is there athleticism in the family? Does the horse in question have good physical attributes, does it display athletic ability in the way it handles itself? Does it have the appearance of an athlete and a balanced build (conformation)?

What did its relatives _ in this case mom and dad in particular _ do on the racetrack? Where do you intend to race the horse in question and does it have the potential traits necessary to perform there? How does the horse stack up against others of its age up for bid?

A strong turnout of buyers had many of those very questions in mind on Monday when they surveyed the stock on hand at the 2014 Minnesota Thoroughbred Association Yearling Sale at the Scott Country FaIrgrounds.

The buyers of the 2014 sale topper, a filly named Girlatwerk who went for $52,000, asked themselves many of those questions as they surveyed this daughter of Yes It’s True from the mare Dee’s Rose _ or least, the leader of the group did, in this case trainer Mac Robertson.

First of all the details of the sale:

In total, 69 yearlings were consigned and 67 of those went through the sale ring. New owners bought 43 of those horses at an average price of $10,560 and a total sale of $454,100. The highest previous gross since 2,000 took place at the 2007 sale and totalled $434,600.

The sale was moved this year to the fairgrounds because of full stables at Canterbury Park and the construction of the Events Center.

“Our straw poll showed that people liked the location because it had a lot of good areas for looking at horses,” said Kay King, executive director of the MTA. “We also started at 1:30 p.m., and were finished by 5:15, instead of ending in the dark if we had started after the races.”

In addition, King said, buyers were moving horses off the grounds at midnight as some them had to do with a later start.

Now, back to Hip No. 39, Girlatwerk, assigned by Wildcat Ranch LLC.

“She was the most athletic horse of the bunch, I thought,” said Robertson. ”

“Her dam could run and she was a good first foal out of the mare. She could run and so could Yes It’s True.” The filly had a nice walk to her, Robertson said, and “vetted out well with a “good scope and x rays.

“I thought we were lucky to get her for $52,000,” Robertson added. “I thought a horse like that might go for $70 to $90,000 at Keeneland. So I was happy to get her for what we did.”

Any buyer’s remorse on Tuesday morning?

“I usually do when I buy a horse,” Robertson said. “Sometimes you wake up in the morning and wonder how much (alcohol) did it take to buy that. But in this case I thought this horse was athletic, probably good enough to run in open company. So you have to pay a little more for one like that. I actually would have gone higher on her.”

There was one more reason in Robertson’s reasoning as well. “I didn’t want to get outbid by Diodoro,” he said. “We did get outbid on a couple earlier.”

Robertson can win his 10th consecutive training title this meet and presently leads by Diodoro by two wins heading into the homestretch.

Robertson said his little group doesn’t have a name per se. “They call me names instead,” he quipped. “It’s hard to get a group of five guys to get along, especially if I’m involved.”

Robertson’s group includes Jeff Larson, John Mentz and Gary Chanen on the sale topper. They also bought another horse that includes Jeff Ryan in the group.

“We’re all delusional enough to think that we can along,” Robertson cracked.

As for the group’s new filly, she was vanned to Jeff and Deb Hilger’s place in Grant Township. From there she will go to Ocala, Fla., eventually for breaking.

“Hopefully she’ll run at two,” Robertson added.

There were other factors Robertson considered, too. “Yes It’s True, I love him as a Minnesota-bred sire,” he said. “Speed horses do well on the Canterbury track, and his horses are athletic, usually early and have speed.”

But there is always this racetrack caveat to consider also:

“Just because I thought she was the best one of the bunch yesterday, doesn’t mean she’ll stay ahead of them later on down the road. But you pay extra for a horse that is ahead right now.”

Stay tuned.

Here is a summary of the sale.

 

BY JIM WELLS

FILLY GOES FOR TOP PRICE AT MTA SALE

MTA_Cover01a

You want a horse, one with potential and the promise of earning back its purchase price and maybe even a nice profit to boot. So what do you look for and how do you know if you’re on the right track?

Well, it’s not much different than scouting ball players in some respects. Is there athleticism in the family? Does the horse in question have good physical attributes, does it display athletic ability in the way it handles itself? Does it have the appearance of an athlete and a balanced build (conformation)?

What did its relatives _ in this case mom and dad in particular _ do on the racetrack? Where do you intend to race the horse in question and does it have the potential traits necessary to perform there? How does the horse stack up against others of its age up for bid?

A strong turnout of buyers had many of those very questions in mind on Monday when they surveyed the stock on hand at the 2014 Minnesota Thoroughbred Association Yearling Sale at the Scott Country FaIrgrounds.

The buyers of the 2014 sale topper, a filly named Girlatwerk who went for $52,000, asked themselves many of those questions as they surveyed this daughter of Yes It’s True from the mare Dee’s Rose _ or least, the leader of the group did, in this case trainer Mac Robertson.

First of all the details of the sale:

In total, 69 yearlings were consigned and 67 of those went through the sale ring. New owners bought 43 of those horses at an average price of $10,560 and a total sale of $454,100. The highest previous gross since 2,000 took place at the 2007 sale and totalled $434,600.

The sale was moved this year to the fairgrounds because of full stables at Canterbury Park and the construction of the Events Center.

“Our straw poll showed that people liked the location because it had a lot of good areas for looking at horses,” said Kay King, executive director of the MTA. “We also started at 1:30 p.m., and were finished by 5:15, instead of ending in the dark if we had started after the races.”

In addition, King said, buyers were moving horses off the grounds at midnight as some them had to do with a later start.

Now, back to Hip No. 39, Girlatwerk, assigned by Wildcat Ranch LLC.

“She was the most athletic horse of the bunch, I thought,” said Robertson. ”

“Her dam could run and she was a good first foal out of the mare. She could run and so could Yes It’s True.” The filly had a nice walk to her, Robertson said, and “vetted out well with a “good scope and x rays.

“I thought we were lucky to get her for $52,000,” Robertson added. “I thought a horse like that might go for $70 to $90,000 at Keeneland. So I was happy to get her for what we did.”

Any buyer’s remorse on Tuesday morning?

“I usually do when I buy a horse,” Robertson said. “Sometimes you wake up in the morning and wonder how much (alcohol) did it take to buy that. But in this case I thought this horse was athletic, probably good enough to run in open company. So you have to pay a little more for one like that. I actually would have gone higher on her.”

There was one more reason in Robertson’s reasoning as well. “I didn’t want to get outbid by Diodoro,” he said. “We did get outbid on a couple earlier.”

Robertson can win his 10th consecutive training title this meet and presently leads by Diodoro by two wins heading into the homestretch.

Robertson said his little group doesn’t have a name per se. “They call me names instead,” he quipped. “It’s hard to get a group of five guys to get along, especially if I’m involved.”

Robertson’s group includes Jeff Larson, John Mentz and Gary Chanen on the sale topper. They also bought another horse that includes Jeff Ryan in the group.

“We’re all delusional enough to think that we can along,” Robertson cracked.

As for the group’s new filly, she was vanned to Jeff and Deb Hilger’s place in Grant Township. From there she will go to Ocala, Fla., eventually for breaking.

“Hopefully she’ll run at two,” Robertson added.

There were other factors Robertson considered, too. “Yes It’s True, I love him as a Minnesota-bred sire,” he said. “Speed horses do well on the Canterbury track, and his horses are athletic, usually early and have speed.”

But there is always this racetrack caveat to consider also:

“Just because I thought she was the best one of the bunch yesterday, doesn’t mean she’ll stay ahead of them later on down the road. But you pay extra for a horse that is ahead right now.”

Stay tuned.

Here is a summary of the sale.

 

BY JIM WELLS

MTA YEARLING SALE CHANGES LOCATION, TIME

hip 22

Changes sometimes entail more changes and that is the case with the Minnesota Thoroughbred Association’s yearling and mixed age sale that annually has taken place at Canterbury Park.

Full stables (not always the case in the track’s history) and construction of the Expo Center at the track’s main entrance have left no room to stage this year’s sale.

Thus, a new location. The sale will be held Monday afternoon, 1:30, at the Scott Country Fairgrounds, 15 minutes south of the track on Highway 169.

Horsemen can preview this year’s stock beginning at 6:30 p.m., on Sunday and again on Monday prior to the sale, from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m.

The sale has been held following the racing program on a race day in previous years, but was moved to a dark day to accommodate trainers, according to MTA director Kay King. “We listened to their comments that it was difficult to train, run horses and inspect consignment and attend a sale on the same day,” she said. “So we moved the sale to a Monday.”

A full barn is expected by sale time. “Currently we have 69 yearlings and six broodmares cataloged,” said King. Details on those horses are available online at www.minnesotabred.com. Print copies are available in the HBPA and racing offices, the horsemen’s bookkeeping office and the track level information booth and card club reception desks.

BY JIM WELLS

MTA Yearling Sale Shows Substantial Gains

Maybe one item alone will say everything necessary about the Minnesota Thoroughbred Association yearling and mixed sale Saturday evening. Executive director Kay King was almost, not quite, but almost ready to officially declare the sale topper the highest purchase of all-time.

“I’m going to check our records, but I’m almost sure it is,” she said.

The topper was hip No. 6, a dark bay or brown colt by Holy Bull, the 1994 U.S. Horse of the Year, from Run With Joy (Canterbury Park’s 2007 Horse of the Meet) and was purchased for $56,000 by Barry and Joni Butzow.

“He vetted out, was pretty correct and was feisty,” Joni said.

It was the colt’s bottom side that interested Barry. “I don’t care about Holy Bull but look back a couple of generations on the other side,” he said.

Yes, there is a connection to some fine blood on the bottom side as well. Run With Joy is by Ghazi from Unbridled Joy, who is by Unbridled, the 1990 Kentucky Derby and Breeders’ Cup Classic winner and three-year-old colt of the year.

The $56,000 colt was consigned by Oak Tree Farm as agent for Raymond and Karen Wheeler.

The transaction itself was a shot in the arm for an industry that has struggled and suffered from a lack of optimism and enthusiasm.

There was nothing of the kind this time around; in fact, it was quite the reverse, due largely, of course, to the marketing deal struck between Canterbury Park and Mystic Lake.

“It was amazing,” said King. “First of all because of a renewed energy; you could feel it from the consignors and the purchasers. Everyone seemed hopeful now that there is a future. People can recognize that. There is something worth running for.”

Hip No. 13, a dark bay or brown gelding by Orientate from Star Crusader, was purchased for$31,000 by Jim Thares from Kim Heytens and Kimberly Meadows.

Next on the list was a $25,000 purchased by Kenneth Larson from Wood-Mere Farm, LLC, a dark bay or brown filly by Orientate from Miners Mirage.

There was a $22,500 purchase, a gray or roan filly by Monarchos from Harmony Found, by Anthony Didier from Wood-Mere Farm, LLC, agent for Irish Rose Racing, LLC.

All of that had King in a much better mood than on the mornings after recent sales. “It’s so much more fun doing the results this morning than especially two years ago,” she said.

In 2010, the average sale price was $4,959 and the median was $2,600 on the sale of 17 horses for a total of $84,300.

Those figures improved last year with an average price of $6,403 with a median of $3,000. The gross on 31 horses sold was $198,500.

Now take a look at 2012:

The average was $10,332, the median was $5,500 and the gross on 31 horses was $320,300 – an increase of over 60% from 2011 and an increase of nearly 280% compared to 2010.

Twenty-six Minnesota-breds sold for an average of $11,754. Also in the sale were four Kentucky-breds and an Ontario-bred.

King made other observations that suggested a larger, maybe more diversified market.

“It’s interesting because there were many new faces, people we hadn’t sold to before and also people we haven’t sold to in quite a while. That was reassuring as well.”

King envisions her role as a cheerleader for such functions. “From the time we set the date and sent out the consignment forms to everyone with Minnesota-bred yearlings it’s my job to pull out the pom poms and be the cheerleader no matter how bad things have been the last couple of years.”

Her job, she said, was a lot easier this year. She was selling some reality instead of a roll of the dice.

This blog was written by Canterbury Staff Writer Jim Wells. Wells was a longtime sportswriter at the Pioneer Press and is a member of the Canterbury Park Hall of Fame.

Photo Credit: Coady Photography

MTA Yearling Sale Shows Substantial Gains

Maybe one item alone will say everything necessary about the Minnesota Thoroughbred Association yearling and mixed sale Saturday evening. Executive director Kay King was almost, not quite, but almost ready to officially declare the sale topper the highest purchase of all-time.

“I’m going to check our records, but I’m almost sure it is,” she said.

The topper was hip No. 6, a dark bay or brown colt by Holy Bull, the 1994 U.S. Horse of the Year, from Run With Joy (Canterbury Park’s 2007 Horse of the Meet) and was purchased for $56,000 by Barry and Joni Butzow.

“He vetted out, was pretty correct and was feisty,” Joni said.

It was the colt’s bottom side that interested Barry. “I don’t care about Holy Bull but look back a couple of generations on the other side,” he said.

Yes, there is a connection to some fine blood on the bottom side as well. Run With Joy is by Ghazi from Unbridled Joy, who is by Unbridled, the 1990 Kentucky Derby and Breeders’ Cup Classic winner and three-year-old colt of the year.

The $56,000 colt was consigned by Oak Tree Farm as agent for Raymond and Karen Wheeler.

The transaction itself was a shot in the arm for an industry that has struggled and suffered from a lack of optimism and enthusiasm.

There was nothing of the kind this time around; in fact, it was quite the reverse, due largely, of course, to the marketing deal struck between Canterbury Park and Mystic Lake.

“It was amazing,” said King. “First of all because of a renewed energy; you could feel it from the consignors and the purchasers. Everyone seemed hopeful now that there is a future. People can recognize that. There is something worth running for.”

Hip No. 13, a dark bay or brown gelding by Orientate from Star Crusader, was purchased for$31,000 by Jim Thares from Kim Heytens and Kimberly Meadows.

Next on the list was a $25,000 purchased by Kenneth Larson from Wood-Mere Farm, LLC, a dark bay or brown filly by Orientate from Miners Mirage.

There was a $22,500 purchase, a gray or roan filly by Monarchos from Harmony Found, by Anthony Didier from Wood-Mere Farm, LLC, agent for Irish Rose Racing, LLC.

All of that had King in a much better mood than on the mornings after recent sales. “It’s so much more fun doing the results this morning than especially two years ago,” she said.

In 2010, the average sale price was $4,959 and the median was $2,600 on the sale of 17 horses for a total of $84,300.

Those figures improved last year with an average price of $6,403 with a median of $3,000. The gross on 31 horses sold was $198,500.

Now take a look at 2012:

The average was $10,332, the median was $5,500 and the gross on 31 horses was $320,300 – an increase of over 60% from 2011 and an increase of nearly 280% compared to 2010.

Twenty-six Minnesota-breds sold for an average of $11,754. Also in the sale were four Kentucky-breds and an Ontario-bred.

King made other observations that suggested a larger, maybe more diversified market.

“It’s interesting because there were many new faces, people we hadn’t sold to before and also people we haven’t sold to in quite a while. That was reassuring as well.”

King envisions her role as a cheerleader for such functions. “From the time we set the date and sent out the consignment forms to everyone with Minnesota-bred yearlings it’s my job to pull out the pom poms and be the cheerleader no matter how bad things have been the last couple of years.”

Her job, she said, was a lot easier this year. She was selling some reality instead of a roll of the dice.

This blog was written by Canterbury Staff Writer Jim Wells. Wells was a longtime sportswriter at the Pioneer Press and is a member of the Canterbury Park Hall of Fame.

Photo Credit: Coady Photography