Mr. Jagermeister Impressive in Chesapeake Stakes Victory

Mr. Jagermeister won the $100,000 Chesapeake Stakes by 1 ¾ lengths Saturday evening at Colonial Downs in New Kent, Virginia. The 4-year-old Minnesota-bred colt was ridden by Leandro Goncalves and is trained by Valorie Lund. As the wagering favorite he paid $4.20.

Goncalves rode Mr. Jagermeister confidently on the inside, battling with Old Time Revival before pulling away in the stretch and holding off a late charge by Lewisfield. “He’s an awesome horse,” Goncalves said following the win.

Lund was hauling Mr. Jagermeister back to Canterbury Sunday, expecting to arrive in Shakopee in the wee hours of the morning.

“I’m very pleased,” Lund said. “[Mr. Jagermeister] was feisty this morning. He is feeling pretty happy with himself.”

Lund intends to run the 2018 Canterbury Horse of the Meet on Sept. 1 in the Minnesota Festival of Champions. “He will run in one of the two races, but I have not decided yet” she said, referring to the $100,000 Minnesota Sprint Championship or the $100,000 Minnesota Classic Championship, which the colt won last year.

Mr. Jagermeister had not raced since an allowance win at Oaklawn Park April 25. He had a setback that sidelined him this summer but when he returned to the track, he was training so well that Lund knew he needed a race before Festival. “I would have stayed home and run for less money,” she said, but the trainer could not find a race that filled.

Lund’s inclination now is to run in the sprint on Sept. 1 because of the training missed during the lay-off but has time to make that call. Possible foes that day include Hot Shot Kid, who last year won the sprint, or Mister Banjoman winner of the Minnesota Derby. Both are trained by Mac Robertson.

Mr. Jagermeister Ships East To Race Saturday

Bon voyage to 2018 Canterbury Park Horse of the Meet Mr. Jagermeister who ships Wednesday morning from Shakopee to Colonial Downs in New Kent County, Virginia for the  $100,000 Chesapeake Stakes at six furlongs on the main track. Accompanying the 4-year-old Minnesota-bred colt on the 1,250 journey will be trainer Valorie Lund and two other horses entered elsewhere on the card: Ship It Red and Fiftyshadedofgrayce.

Mr. Jagermeister has not run since late April when he won an allowance race at Oaklawn Park. He was entered in the 10,000 Lakes Stakes but scratched due to a wet track and had a minor physical setback that laid him up. He has had five timed workouts since July 13, three of them bullets.

“This is the last chance to run him before Minnesota Festival of Champions,” Lund said over the weekend as she was considering this option and communicating with the Colonial racing secretary to make sure the stake would fill. “He needs a race. He is kicking  the stall down.”  The Festival, which offers both a state-bred sprint and a route, each with a $100,000 purse, to choose from is Sunday,  Sept. 1. In 2018, Mr. Jagermeister won the 1 and  1 /16 mile  Wally’s Choice Minnesota Classic Championship on Festival Day.

The Chesapeake attracted a field of six and will be the fifth race on a 10-race program.  Regular rider Leandro Goncalves has been named on Mr. Jagermeister. Post time is 5:52 p.m. central. Colonial Downs races are simulcast in the Canterbury Park Race Book.

Ship It Red runs in race eight. He won at Oaklawn in April and has since run four consecutive thirds at Canterbury this summer. Fiftyshadesofgrayce has a win here this summer and most recently raced at Arlington Park. She is entered in race six, an allowance optional claiming turf sprint with a $70,000 purse. Goncalves has those mounts as well.

Mr. Jagermeister Returns To Action Saturday

Mr. Jagermeister, the Canterbury Park 2018 Horse of the Year, makes his 4-year-old debut Saturday in the $75,000 Phoenix Gold Cup, the seventh race that day at Turf Paradise.  The Minnesota-bred colt drew post four in the six-horse field that includes three trained by Robertino Diodoro. However one of his, Bourbon Cowboy, is training at Oaklawn and has been entered there on that same day. That may whittle the field to five.

Mr. Jagermeister is the 6 to 5 morning line favorite and will be ridden by Leandro Goncalves who was aboard the colt for all four 2018 Canterbury wins. “I’m happy I’ve got Leandro,” trainer Valorie Lund said. She indicated that the jockey is fully committed and had booked a flight weeks earlier.

Goncalves and Lund confer prior to a race.

Lund is hoping there are no other defections from the race. She wants the race to flow naturally and often when fields get to four or fewer, quirky things can happen.

“It will be interesting see what everyone does,” she said.

Lund is confident in Mr. Jagermeister and has him ready to run this race.  A good performance Saturday opens a world of possibilities for 2019.

Bet the Phoenix Gold Cup in the Canterbury Racebook. Estimated post time is 4:55 p.m. central.

RIDING TITLE UP FOR GRABS AS MEET NEARS END

Shesa Sweet Secret

BY JIM WELLS

You can hear it in the line at your local Cub Foods, the queue at the ATM machine and especially in the racing offices at Canterbury Park.

Where did the summer go?

It’s an annual mystery for all of humankind, but nowhere do the days evaporate as quickly as those spent at the racetrack, where the constant grind of this particular sport can make the hours, days and weeks whirl past a person as if he hasn’t moved a muscle.

Whiff, poof, whisss….

Just like that there are a mere 16 days remaining in the live racing season. Here and gone, the turning of another calendar page. but much is still not over. There are unresolved questions yet to be settled.

As often is the case, the race for leading rider has taken a new, dramatic twist as the days wind down.

Dean Butler, a four-time leading rider in Shakopee, had 10-12 win lead and more midway through the 70-day meet. Leandro Goncalves, who joined the colony in Shakopee for the first time this summer has slowly, steadily and now with a sudden surge moved into the lead.

The Brazilian rider was asked Sunday if he keeps track of such things as jockey standings. A grin spread across his face.

“Well,” he said. “I’ve been chasing and chasing all summer and now I’m in the lead. But you can’t think about such things. You just go out and ride each time and do the job.”

Goncalves wound up in Shakopee this summer largely through the influence of Tom Amoss, and riding for that barn has been a significant factor in his success this summer.

Goncalves finished off a solid week with two  wins on Sunday’s card to finish with six. “Yes, it’s been a good week,” he said. “Quite good.”

He had a win on the Thursday and Friday cards and two on Saturday to take a two-win lead over Butler, and both riders had two wins on Sunday. The second of Butler’s two wins came in the seventh race with a perfectly timed moved aboard Counterfactual to catch Circus Girl at the wire. The irony of that Butler victory was that it came aboard an Amoss-trained horse. Goncalves was fourth aboard the Dallas Keen trained Melody Linn. Butler, meanwhile, continues to assault the yearly jockey earnings record he set last year each time he picks up a check.

Goncalves has enjoyed this first time experience in Shakopee and said he is committed to riding here again if  everything works out. “I really like it here,” he said. “So did my son. He texted me to make sure I could back here. I would really like that. It all depends on business, of course.”

Goncalves rode previously at Churchill Downs and Kenneland Race Course, Indiana Downs and at Gulfstream Park in Flordia, which he calls home. His son Guylherme, 13, lives in Brazil, and has pestered his father for another visit to Minnesota after his stay here this summer. “We both like it,” Leandro said.

Goncalves  has won seven riding titles during his career at various tracks..  Might this be the meet in which he makes it eight?

“We will see,” he said. “I sure hope so.”

STARS SHINE UNDER SATURDAY NIGHT LIGHTS

Hold for More wins Minnesota Derby
Hold for More wins Minnesota Derby

BY JIM WELLS

They might start referring to this August experiment as Saturday Night Lights, and thereby turn it into something permanent for future meets. Then again, the jury is still out with most of the month still ahead.

Nonetheless, Saturday night’s mix of stake races and enticing repasts from a variety of concessionaires who parked their food trucks around the premises made for a large turnout of 14,345 and a festive atmosphere.

Anyone handicapping these races might possibly refer to it as an evening filled with food for thought.

So, chew on this for a moment or two:

A horse named Hold for More might be doing just that as he continues to accrue points in the consideration for Horse of the Year.  There were only minor questions before he lined up against eight others in the $80,000 Minnesota Derby:

Precisely how much class does he have, and can he handle a mile and 70 yards with the same aplomb and efficiency he displayed at sprint distances?

He answered both queries in convincing fashion. The evidence continues to mount that he has much more class than the other 3-year-old Minnesota-breds on the grounds; and, yes, he has the lungs, stamina and desire to run long.

Afterwards, the comments at trackside echoed his superiority. “He is the class.” “A mere formality.”

Under Dean Butler, Hold for More ran well back, as much as six lengths, behind the pacesetters _ Valet and Plenty of Sun _ moved forward on the turn and drew off in the stretch to a commanding three-length win over 3-1 second choice Steviefromstanley, with Plenty of Sun an addition 6 ½ lengths back.

Owner Dale Schenian, who understandably rates his Hall of Fame horse Crocrock No. 1 on his all-time list,  is waiting for more from Hold for More. “He’s No. 2 and still climbing,” Schenian said.

Sent off the 2/5 favorite, Hold For More is four-for-four this year, six for seven lifetime, with one second. A son of Hold Me Back from Miners Mirage, he was bred by Dean and Teresa Benson at their Wood-Mere Farm.

Trainer Francisco Bravo’s biggest concern Friday night was all the activity his horse had not before encountered. “The lights and all the people,” he said. “He was shaking his head and looking around.”

Yet when it mattered most, he attention was squarely focused on the finish line.

The Derby was preceded by the $80,000 Minnesota Oaks, at the same distance and featuring two tough fillies expected to slug it out for this crown.

Shaboom went off the favorite in the Frances Genter Stakes but was put away by Silver Magna. Those two gathered the lion’s share of attention at the betting windows, going off at 3/2 and 7/5 respectively.

Surprise!!!

Which is precisely how owner Jeff Larson put it when his Sioux Appeal commanded the stretch for a 4 ¼ length victory over Silver Magna with Captains Glory another length back. Shaboom had nothing left for the stretch drive and finished off the board in fifth.

Larson, a Hudson, Wis., resident, summed up the victory this way: “It was a nice surprise, he ran a good race and the jockey (Leandro Goncalves) rode a good race.”

Goncalves and Sioux Appeal were well back and moved up on the turned taking the lead at the stretch call.  “We just stayed behind the speed and moved up inside waiting for our chance,” said Goncalves.

The chance came with the leaders faltering and the favorites unable to match strides with the winner.

In an earlier race, Stormation was much the best at 1/5 in the $40,000 Careless Navigator Overnight Stakes. Trained by Robertino Diodoro and ridden by Jorge Carreno, he finished a length in front of stablemate Cake Baby but was never in serious trouble.

Diamond Joe, with Dean Butler up, was an easy winner at 4-1 in the $40,000 John Bullit Stakes at a mile and 1/16, finishing 5 ¼ lengths in front of 12-1 Evansville Storm.

The win was the 20th for Diamond Joe, placing him among the top five all-time Nebraska-bred winners, a list that includes his sire, Dazzling Falls, at the top and Who Doctor Who, a favorite among Canterbury fans in the 1980s in second place.

Trainer Chuck Turco was a youngster at the time Who Doctor Who made his impression but is quite familiar with Nebraska-bred feats accomplished at Canterbury Park over the decades.

Diamond Joe’s win was one more reason he considered him a special horse. The fact that he grooms the horse himself is another. Saturday night’s accomplishment is another.

On a night of fine food, a large crowd and four stake races, Sir Searsucker expanded his lungs and his credentials with a convincing win at a mile and 3/8ths on the turf. Yes, that distance is correct, although there were a number of folks in the crowd who cheered twice, unaware that the distance required more than one pass in front of the grandstand.

At that point, the question arose in the hallowed confines of the press-box (racing’s closest thing to a center of learning or perhaps medieval library) regarding the reasons for the large Saturday evening turnout.  Was it the food trucks, offering a wide and seemingly unending variety of choices, or the allure of a race such as the one featuring Sir Searsucker.

“Well, the crowd did react twice for the race,” said pressbox librarian Jeff Maday, never one to closet his sense of humor and whimsy.

On a night of plenty, additional food for thought.

STARS SHINE UNDER SATURDAY NIGHT LIGHTS

Hold for More wins Minnesota Derby
Hold for More wins Minnesota Derby

BY JIM WELLS

They might start referring to this August experiment as Saturday Night Lights, and thereby turn it into something permanent for future meets. Then again, the jury is still out with most of the month still ahead.

Nonetheless, Saturday night’s mix of stake races and enticing repasts from a variety of concessionaires who parked their food trucks around the premises made for a large turnout of 14,345 and a festive atmosphere.

Anyone handicapping these races might possibly refer to it as an evening filled with food for thought.

So, chew on this for a moment or two:

A horse named Hold for More might be doing just that as he continues to accrue points in the consideration for Horse of the Year.  There were only minor questions before he lined up against eight others in the $80,000 Minnesota Derby:

Precisely how much class does he have, and can he handle a mile and 70 yards with the same aplomb and efficiency he displayed at sprint distances?

He answered both queries in convincing fashion. The evidence continues to mount that he has much more class than the other 3-year-old Minnesota-breds on the grounds; and, yes, he has the lungs, stamina and desire to run long.

Afterwards, the comments at trackside echoed his superiority. “He is the class.” “A mere formality.”

Under Dean Butler, Hold for More ran well back, as much as six lengths, behind the pacesetters _ Valet and Plenty of Sun _ moved forward on the turn and drew off in the stretch to a commanding three-length win over 3-1 second choice Steviefromstanley, with Plenty of Sun an addition 6 ½ lengths back.

Owner Dale Schenian, who understandably rates his Hall of Fame horse Crocrock No. 1 on his all-time list,  is waiting for more from Hold for More. “He’s No. 2 and still climbing,” Schenian said.

Sent off the 2/5 favorite, Hold For More is four-for-four this year, six for seven lifetime, with one second. A son of Hold Me Back from Miners Mirage, he was bred by Dean and Teresa Benson at their Wood-Mere Farm.

Trainer Francisco Bravo’s biggest concern Friday night was all the activity his horse had not before encountered. “The lights and all the people,” he said. “He was shaking his head and looking around.”

Yet when it mattered most, he attention was squarely focused on the finish line.

The Derby was preceded by the $80,000 Minnesota Oaks, at the same distance and featuring two tough fillies expected to slug it out for this crown.

Shaboom went off the favorite in the Frances Genter Stakes but was put away by Silver Magna. Those two gathered the lion’s share of attention at the betting windows, going off at 3/2 and 7/5 respectively.

Surprise!!!

Which is precisely how owner Jeff Larson put it when his Sioux Appeal commanded the stretch for a 4 ¼ length victory over Silver Magna with Captains Glory another length back. Shaboom had nothing left for the stretch drive and finished off the board in fifth.

Larson, a Hudson, Wis., resident, summed up the victory this way: “It was a nice surprise, he ran a good race and the jockey (Leandro Goncalves) rode a good race.”

Goncalves and Sioux Appeal were well back and moved up on the turned taking the lead at the stretch call.  “We just stayed behind the speed and moved up inside waiting for our chance,” said Goncalves.

The chance came with the leaders faltering and the favorites unable to match strides with the winner.

In an earlier race, Stormation was much the best at 1/5 in the $40,000 Careless Navigator Overnight Stakes. Trained by Robertino Diodoro and ridden by Jorge Carreno, he finished a length in front of stablemate Cake Baby but was never in serious trouble.

Diamond Joe, with Dean Butler up, was an easy winner at 4-1 in the $40,000 John Bullit Stakes at a mile and 1/16, finishing 5 ¼ lengths in front of 12-1 Evansville Storm.

The win was the 20th for Diamond Joe, placing him among the top five all-time Nebraska-bred winners, a list that includes his sire, Dazzling Falls, at the top and Who Doctor Who, a favorite among Canterbury fans in the 1980s in second place.

Trainer Chuck Turco was a youngster at the time Who Doctor Who made his impression but is quite familiar with Nebraska-bred feats accomplished at Canterbury Park over the decades.

Diamond Joe’s win was one more reason he considered him a special horse. The fact that he grooms the horse himself is another. Saturday night’s accomplishment is another.

On a night of fine food, a large crowd and four stake races, Sir Searsucker expanded his lungs and his credentials with a convincing win at a mile and 3/8ths on the turf. Yes, that distance is correct, although there were a number of folks in the crowd who cheered twice, unaware that the distance required more than one pass in front of the grandstand.

At that point, the question arose in the hallowed confines of the press-box (racing’s closest thing to a center of learning or perhaps medieval library) regarding the reasons for the large Saturday evening turnout.  Was it the food trucks, offering a wide and seemingly unending variety of choices, or the allure of a race such as the one featuring Sir Searsucker.

“Well, the crowd did react twice for the race,” said pressbox librarian Jeff Maday, never one to closet his sense of humor and whimsy.

On a night of plenty, additional food for thought.

Mystic Lake Derby Day Nears

MysticDerby_LogoGo ahead and pick up the champagne, dig out the attire you wore last year for the race, careful to assure everything is the same, not a single accoutrement out-of-place, cross your fingers and don’t say anything that might be construed as a jinx.

“My dad’s superstitious,” said Lori Keith. “It will have to be the same shirt, everything.”

The topic at hand is the second running of the Mystic Lake Derby on Saturday and the preparations of Mr and Mrs. Keith – William and Philomena (or Bill and Phil as they’re known) – for Saturday’s race.

For the uniformed, Lori Keith, a native of England and a regular rider at Canterbury Park, won the first running of the biggest race in Canterbury Park history last year aboard Hammers Terror, owned by Terry Hamilton and trained by Michael Stidham.

Bill asked his daughter in a recent conversation whether she would ride in the race again this year. When she informed him that the chances appeared good, he began making plans. “He wanted to know if he should get the champagne,” Lori said.

Keith’s parents, who own a restaurant in the South of France, watched the inaugural running down the street from the restaurant, at an acquaintance’s home. Good viewing, just a matter of connecting the laptop to the telly, as they say, and they saw their daughter win the biggest race of her career.

They plan on looking in again on Saturday.

Keith will ride a horse named Dorsett, owned once again by Hamilton and trained once again by Stidham. And, get this, she is breaking from the No. 2 hole in an eight-horse field, just as last year.

A year ago, Keith took the morning line second choice to the winner’s circle after surviving a stewards’ inquiry for interference in the stretch. This time she is on the 5/2 morning line favorite.

“I think he has a great shot,” she said. “On paper he looks very good, but I think it will be a very competitive race.”

Dorsett, a son of Artie Schiller from Dontgetnmyway, has two wins, a second and a third from eight career starts with earnings of $74,670. He is part of a field of eight that will engage at one mile on the turf.

$200,000 Mystic Lake Derby Field & Morning Line
PP Horse Trainer Jockey ML
1    Impassable Canyon Michael Maker Victor Lebron 5-1
2 Dorsett Michael Stidham Lori Keith 5/2
3 Finding Candy Michael Biehler Denny Velazquez 12-1
4 Coastal Breeze Wayne Catalano Channing Hill 4-1
5 Kale’s Kourage Kelly Von Hemel Ry Eikleberry 10-1
6 Evan’s Calling Neil Pessin Eddie Martin Jr. 8-1
7 Red Zeus Dan McFarlane Alex Canchari 6-1
8 Officer Alex Lynn Whiting Leandro Goncalves 9/2

Last year the purse was for a guaranteed $150,000 and produced a total of $162,000 and change after adding in the entry fees. This year the race offers a guaranteed $200,000. The lion’s share of that funding, $150,000, is provided by the Mystic Lake purse enhancement fund.

The inside post was drawn by Impassable Canyon, a colt by Tapit from Anna Forever, owned by F. Thomas Conway and trained by Mike Maker.

Finding Candy will line up in the No. 3 hole. He is a colt by Candy Ride, owned locally by Al and Bill Ulwelling and trained by Mike Biehler.

The No. 4 hole will go to Coastal Breeze, a colt by Empire Maker that is owned by Barry Golden and trained by Wayne Catalano. The No. 5 hole belongs to Kale’s Kourage who has earned $85,511 lifetime and has won three of his seven career starts. He is owned by Pam Von Hemel and trained by Kelly Von Hemel.

Lining up in the No. 6 spot will be Evan’s Calling, with one win in 11 career starts. The No. 7 belongs to Red Zeus, who has earned $112, 426, running primarily at Turf Paradise in Phoenix with two starts locally, including a win at six furlongs his last out. He is owned by Peggy Hopwood and trained by Dan McFarlane.

Officer Alex drew the outside post. He has earned $163,000 running on the circuit between Churchill Downs and Oaklawn Park. He is trained by Lynn Whiting, who saddled Lil E. Tee, the winner of the 1992 Kentucky Derby.

So, there you have it, the lineup for the richest race in Canterbury Park history, a whopping $200,000 guaranteed and an opportunity for Lori Keith to top last year’s take.

“Oh, I can’t believe it,” she said. “I’m keeping my fingers crossed.”

Is superstition a genetic trait?

SHAKOPEE JUVENILE AND NORTHBOUND PRIDE OAKS

Both races offer $100,000-guaranteed purses.

The Oaks at a mile on the turf has been run in some form, fashion or name since 1985 and was won in 2012 by Soonerette, ridden by riding champion Tanner Riggs for Donnie Von Hemel.

$100,000 Northbound Pride Oaks & Morning Line Odds
PP Horse Trainer Jockey ML
1    Eden Prairie Neil Pessin Channing Hill 3-1
2 Kipling’s Joy Michael Stidham Dean Butler 9/2
3 Stoupinator Mac Robertson Alex Canchari 5-1
4 I’m Already Sexy Wayne Catalano Scott Stevens 4-1
5 Seeking Treasure Larry Dunbar Ry Eikleberry 10-1
6 Raising Dakota Tevis McCauley Luis Garcia 8-1
7 Kissmeimdanish Valorie Lund Derek Bell 8-1
8 American Sugar Kenneth McPeek Victor Lebron 6-1

Saturday’s edition has a field of eight, including the Ken McPeek-trained American Sugar, who is trying the grass for the first time and is 5-0-3 from 13 starts with earnings of more than $200,000. Robert Lothenbach’s Eden Prairie is 2-0-1 from six grass starts and earnings of $70,000-plus. Michael Stidham’s Kipling’s Joy is 2-0-3 from nine career starts, both wins on the grass, with earnings of $62,200.

I’m Already Sexy arrived from Arlington Park and has won twice from three turf starts, is three-for-six overall, and earned $81,141. Wayne Catalano trains. Locally-owned Stoupinator, trained by Mac Robertson, has hit the board three times in three turf starts and is 2-1-2 overall from six career starts with earnings of $76,000. Here’s a look at the field:

The Juvenile, for colts/geldings and fillies, is being run for the first time, at 7 and 1/2 furlongs on the turf and has attracted a field of nine boys.

$100,000 Shakopee Juvenile Field & Morning Line Odds
PP Horse Trainer Jockey ML
1    A P Is Loose Michael Biehler Lori Keith 6-1
2 Aft Michael Lauer Leandro Goncalves 8-1
3 Rumbauer David Van Winkle Ry Eikleberry 6-1
4 My Corinthian Dane Kobiskie Luis Garcia 7/2
5 Fling Orrin Cogburn Eddie Martin Jr. 12-1
6 Clarisimo Sandra Sweere Nik Goodwin 10-1
7 General Jack Michael Maker Victor Lebron 3-1
8 Chairman Crooks Tony Rengstorf Dean Butler 6-1
9 Pure Surprize Vic Hanson Jenna Joubert 10-1

Among those is a 2-year-old colt named General Jack, a Kentucky-bred son of Giant’s Causeway who is looking to break his maiden on Saturday after running second among maiden special weights for $70,000 at Belmont Park.

He had a bullet work in late June and is trained by Mike Maker who has made a habit of winning big races at Canterbury.

Aft, trained by Michael Lauer, broke his maiden last time out in Indiana. Lauer tried to run Aft on the lead his first out and finished second. He ran him off the pace in his second start with improved results.

My Corinthian has hit the board three times in three career starts and was the first of the shippers to arrive, stabling here on Monday. He is trained by Dane Kobiskie. He is 1-1-1 from three career starts and is 1-1-0 from two outs on the grass.

Mike Biehler will saddle A P Is Loose, who ran third in his first start, at Canterbury on July 11. Clarisimo, trained by Sandra Sweere, is another local horse who broke his maiden here on June 16. Dave Van Winkle will saddle locally stabled Rumbauer, who broke his maiden under Ry Eikleberry on July 11 in his second start.

Vic Hanson will send out Pure Surprize, a local juvenile who broke his maiden at first asking on July 14. Fling, trained by Orrin Cogburn, did not hit the board in two previous starts.

Curtis Sampson’s Chairman Crooks, named for the late leader of the Mdewakanton Community, is trying the grass for the first time. He broke his maiden first time out, on June 13.

Wagering Opportunities Abound

The three races will be run as races 6, 7 and 8 on the card with the Oaks leading off, followed by the Juvenile and then the 2nd running of the Mystic Lake Derby. Post times are 4:10 CDT, 4:40 CDT and the Mystic Lake Derby will go off at 5:12 CDT. The three races anchor Saturday’s late pick 4 which continues to feature a 14% takeout, among the lowest in the country. Additionally, the three stakes comprise an all-turf Pick 3 also featuring the same low takeout rate of 14%.

Check back here often to learn more about the participants for Saturday’s big races over the coming days.

This blog was written by Canterbury Staff Writer Jim Wells. Wells was a longtime sportswriter at the Pioneer Press and is a member of the Canterbury Park Hall of Fame.