VON ROSEN PART OF LEG UP FUND RAISER

Anne Von Rosen

BY JIM WELLS

Anne Von Rosen was on the phone from Fulda, Germany, north of Frankfort, where she was visiting for her mother’s birthday. Earlier in the day she had gone for an hour-long horseback ride.

“I rode without holding on today,” she said.

Without holding on.

Von Rosen was paralyzed in an accident as a race ended at Turf Paradise in Phoenix during March, 2014 and underwent successive surgeries, the first immediately following the incident and another lasting seven hours later in the week. Her prognosis was grim after she was diagnosed with a severed spinal cord, yet she already has progressed further than doctors predicted for her at the time and even walks with the assistance of leg braces and a walker.

A few months ago, Von Rosen, impatient and displeased with the treatment she had gotten during rehabilitation in Colorado, sought out other options, at home in Germany and in other parts of the globe. “They were merely preparing me to sit in a wheelchair,” she said at the time.

Von Rosen rode for more than a decade at Canterbury Park and will make her first visit to the Shakopee track since the accident on June 28 in conjunction with the second Leg Up Fund celebration that benefits injured jockeys.  A number of events are planned to help raise money for the Fund, which operates under the the HBPA 501 (c) 3 as a public charity.

“We aren’t like basketball or football players,” Von Rosen said. “They don’t have to worry when they are hurt. We have numerous concerns. We do have on-track insurance but that doesn’t cover much,” she added. “The costs of many injuries are enormous in America as we all know, which is ridiculous. This fund will offer peace of mind to an injured jockey so he or she doesn’t have to worry about a car payment, a mortgage or the rent while recovering from an injury.”

The Leg Up Fund serves an ulterior purpose as well. “Sometimes injuries take so much longer to heal,” Von Rosen added. “It’s important that people know how dangerous our sport really is. Many of them think we simply go around in a circle on horseback, something like a trail ride.”

Von Rosen now lives in Phoenix and plans to return there following her visit to Shakopee, not overly eager to experience a summer in the Valley of the Sun but grateful nonetheless for her ongoing rehabilitation.

Her presence on Leg Up Day will serve multiple purposes in addition to promotion of the fund established in Shakopee to replace the Don MacBeth Memorial Jockey Fund which was disbanded several years ago.

One of the most significant ways to participate is by sponsoring a jockey with one of the donation applications available at the track.   A number of pictures and other racing paraphernalia from the estate of late Hall of Fame breeder Cam Casby will be up for bid as part of a silent auction. Chances for dinner with local jockeys will also be sold.  In addition, members of the Intercontinental Wrestling Association, including The Brauler, have volunteered time in the dunk tank. Events for children are also planned.

“We planned it out this way (to be at Canterbury on June 28),” Von Rosen said. “Hopefully I can walk around a little bit while I’m there.”

Von Rosen began riding in South Dakota for the barn of trainer Vic Hanson, a regular in Shakopee for years. Her visit will present her with a chance to see him in addition to numerous other friends and acquaintances. “Oh, yes, he knows I’m coming,” Von Rosen added.

As does the entire racetrack community in Shakopee.

 

Anne Von Rosen visits Turf Paradise – Delta Downs Jackpot Saturday

Anne Von Rosen @ TUP 11-16-14 #4

Anne Von Rosen Greets Fans And Friends At Turf Paradise As She Recovers From Injuries 

from www.turfparadise.com

Anne von Rosen’s road to recovery is looking much better more than eight months after a spill that originally left her paralyzed below the waist. The Turf Paradise jockey was seriously hurt in March when a horse she was riding fell on the backstretch following a race at Turf Paradise.  She has undergone several surgeries for spinal cord injuries and months of physical therapy.

On Sunday November 17, friends and fans were stunned when von Rosen visited Turf Paradise and was able to stand with the aid of a walker. She made a surprise visit to the winner’s circle following the running of Sunday’s third race won by Mundy a horse on which von Rosen frequently finished first. She said, “It’s been slow steps getting better and to get back here. But here I am. It feels wonderful.”

read more

 

$1 million Delta Downs Jackpot Saturday / Fair Grounds opens Friday

The Grade 3, $1 million Delta Downs Jackpot and Grade 3, $400,000 Delta Downs Princess will be run Saturday as part of an 11-race extravaganza at the slots-fueled Vinton, Louisiana racetrack.

Post time will be an earlier than normal 1:15 p.m. central. Mutuels windows at Canterbury open at 11 a.m. for wagering.

Both races for 2-year-olds drew full fields and trainer D. Wayne Lukas has the morning line favorite in each including  Breeders’ Cup Juvenile Fillies winner Take Charge Brandi who is 2 to 1 in the Princess.   Read more here at drf.com .

Elsewhere in the Pelican state, Fair Grounds opening night is Friday with a 5 p.m. first post.

 

Kentucky Derby Future Wager – Pool 1 –  Nov. 28 – Nov. 30

Available for wagering at Canterbury Park.

Churchill Downs has established dates for this year’s Kentucky Derby Future Wager, and for the second consecutive year four wagering pools will be featured.

Future Wager (KDFW) dates for the 141st running of the Kentucky Derby will be:

KDFW Pool 1: Friday, Nov. 28 through Sunday, Nov. 30 (22 weeks in advance of Derby)

KDFW Pool 2: Friday, Feb. 6 through Sunday, Feb. 8 (12 weeks in advance of Derby)

KDFW Pool 3: Friday, Feb. 27 through Sunday, March 1 (nine weeks in advance of Derby)

KDFW Pool 4: Friday, March 27 through Sunday, March 29 (five weeks in advance of Derby)
Each pool will be open for three days starting on a Friday at 11 a.m. central and closing on Sunday at 5 p.m.

The Kentucky Oaks Future Wager for 3-year-old fillies will run concurrently with Pool 3 from Friday, Feb. 27 through Sunday, March 1, but will close a half-hour later at 5:30 p.m.

Inaugurated in 1999, the Kentucky Derby Future Wager will be offered for the 17th consecutive year. The Kentucky Oaks Future Wager, introduced in 2003, is entering its 13th year.

The Future Wagers offer racing fans an opportunity to wager on potential contenders well in advance of those races at odds that could be significantly more attractive than those available on the days. For example, California Chrome was the 5-2 favorite on Derby Day this year and paid $7 to win, but the payoffs in future wager Pools 2-4 were significantly greater: $63.40 (Pool 2), $67.60 (Pool 3) and $20.80 (Pool 4). Additionally, he paid $3.60 as part of the pari-mutuel field in Pool 1. Also, Untapable won the Oaks as the even-money favorite ($4) on race day but generated a $12 win-payoff in the Oaks Future Wager.

The Future Wager is a $2 minimum win bet, and exacta betting also is offered. The minimum exacta wager is $2 but is available in $1 increments in the form of an exacta box or wheel or part-wheel combinations that total at least $2.

Each pool will feature 24 wagering interests that include 23 individual horses and a pari-mutuel field known by many fans as the “All Others” bet. No scratches or betting refunds are permitted in either wager but wagering on an individual horse will be suspended immediately if Churchill Downs determines that injury, illness or other circumstance revealed during a pool would prevent a horse from competing in their respective race.

The fields for the Future Wager pools will be selected by a committee and will be announced on the Tuesday preceding the start of the wager. Real-time odds will be presented on KentuckyDerby.com.

Betting on the four pools last year totaled $1,324,466 – $273,174 in Pool 1; $380,249 in Pool 2; $334,326 in Pool 3; and $336,717 in Pool 4 – plus another $81,234 was wagered on the Oaks Future pool.

The $2 million Kentucky Derby Presented by Yum! Brands (GI) for 3-year-olds at 1 ¼ miles will be staged Saturday, May 2. The 141st running of the $1 million Longines Kentucky Oaks (GI) for 3-year-old fillies at 1 1/8 miles goes on Friday, May 1.

Anne Von Rosen visits Turf Paradise – Delta Downs Jackpot Saturday

Anne Von Rosen @ TUP 11-16-14 #4

Anne Von Rosen Greets Fans And Friends At Turf Paradise As She Recovers From Injuries 

from www.turfparadise.com

Anne von Rosen’s road to recovery is looking much better more than eight months after a spill that originally left her paralyzed below the waist. The Turf Paradise jockey was seriously hurt in March when a horse she was riding fell on the backstretch following a race at Turf Paradise.  She has undergone several surgeries for spinal cord injuries and months of physical therapy.

On Sunday November 17, friends and fans were stunned when von Rosen visited Turf Paradise and was able to stand with the aid of a walker. She made a surprise visit to the winner’s circle following the running of Sunday’s third race won by Mundy a horse on which von Rosen frequently finished first. She said, “It’s been slow steps getting better and to get back here. But here I am. It feels wonderful.”

read more

 

$1 million Delta Downs Jackpot Saturday / Fair Grounds opens Friday

The Grade 3, $1 million Delta Downs Jackpot and Grade 3, $400,000 Delta Downs Princess will be run Saturday as part of an 11-race extravaganza at the slots-fueled Vinton, Louisiana racetrack.

Post time will be an earlier than normal 1:15 p.m. central. Mutuels windows at Canterbury open at 11 a.m. for wagering.

Both races for 2-year-olds drew full fields and trainer D. Wayne Lukas has the morning line favorite in each including  Breeders’ Cup Juvenile Fillies winner Take Charge Brandi who is 2 to 1 in the Princess.   Read more here at drf.com .

Elsewhere in the Pelican state, Fair Grounds opening night is Friday with a 5 p.m. first post.

 

Kentucky Derby Future Wager – Pool 1 –  Nov. 28 – Nov. 30

Available for wagering at Canterbury Park.

Churchill Downs has established dates for this year’s Kentucky Derby Future Wager, and for the second consecutive year four wagering pools will be featured.

Future Wager (KDFW) dates for the 141st running of the Kentucky Derby will be:

KDFW Pool 1: Friday, Nov. 28 through Sunday, Nov. 30 (22 weeks in advance of Derby)

KDFW Pool 2: Friday, Feb. 6 through Sunday, Feb. 8 (12 weeks in advance of Derby)

KDFW Pool 3: Friday, Feb. 27 through Sunday, March 1 (nine weeks in advance of Derby)

KDFW Pool 4: Friday, March 27 through Sunday, March 29 (five weeks in advance of Derby)
Each pool will be open for three days starting on a Friday at 11 a.m. central and closing on Sunday at 5 p.m.

The Kentucky Oaks Future Wager for 3-year-old fillies will run concurrently with Pool 3 from Friday, Feb. 27 through Sunday, March 1, but will close a half-hour later at 5:30 p.m.

Inaugurated in 1999, the Kentucky Derby Future Wager will be offered for the 17th consecutive year. The Kentucky Oaks Future Wager, introduced in 2003, is entering its 13th year.

The Future Wagers offer racing fans an opportunity to wager on potential contenders well in advance of those races at odds that could be significantly more attractive than those available on the days. For example, California Chrome was the 5-2 favorite on Derby Day this year and paid $7 to win, but the payoffs in future wager Pools 2-4 were significantly greater: $63.40 (Pool 2), $67.60 (Pool 3) and $20.80 (Pool 4). Additionally, he paid $3.60 as part of the pari-mutuel field in Pool 1. Also, Untapable won the Oaks as the even-money favorite ($4) on race day but generated a $12 win-payoff in the Oaks Future Wager.

The Future Wager is a $2 minimum win bet, and exacta betting also is offered. The minimum exacta wager is $2 but is available in $1 increments in the form of an exacta box or wheel or part-wheel combinations that total at least $2.

Each pool will feature 24 wagering interests that include 23 individual horses and a pari-mutuel field known by many fans as the “All Others” bet. No scratches or betting refunds are permitted in either wager but wagering on an individual horse will be suspended immediately if Churchill Downs determines that injury, illness or other circumstance revealed during a pool would prevent a horse from competing in their respective race.

The fields for the Future Wager pools will be selected by a committee and will be announced on the Tuesday preceding the start of the wager. Real-time odds will be presented on KentuckyDerby.com.

Betting on the four pools last year totaled $1,324,466 – $273,174 in Pool 1; $380,249 in Pool 2; $334,326 in Pool 3; and $336,717 in Pool 4 – plus another $81,234 was wagered on the Oaks Future pool.

The $2 million Kentucky Derby Presented by Yum! Brands (GI) for 3-year-olds at 1 ¼ miles will be staged Saturday, May 2. The 141st running of the $1 million Longines Kentucky Oaks (GI) for 3-year-old fillies at 1 1/8 miles goes on Friday, May 1.

Leg Up Fund

Anne Von Rosen
Anne Von Rosen

Fans place a certain amount of faith and trust in the riders aboard the horses they wager on each racing day at Canterbury Park. In a reversal of that expectation, it is the riders who believe that fans will participate any way they can in the Leg Up Fund that is being established today at Canterbury.

 The Fund is intended to fill some of the void left when the Don MacBeth Memorial Jockey Fund was discontinued a few years ago. Unlike that effort which benefited injured riders nationwide, the Leg Up Fund is intended exclusively for jockeys at Canterbury Park.

 “It’s a tremendous idea,” said Canterbury Hall of Fame rider Scott Stevens, who frequently advocates on behalf of his fellow riders. “We’re basically athletes who don’t have a contract, whose only agreement is for the horse we’re riding at a given time. It’s not like other sports. We don’t get paid if we don’t ride.”

 Perhaps Sunday’s inaugural fundraiser should be called Anne Von Rosen Day. All money raised will be used to benefit the long-time Canterbury rider, who was paralyzed in an accident at Turf Paradise Racetrack in March and has been accruing ongoing and onerous medical expense.

  “I can’t imagine the medical bills involved,” said fellow rider Lori Keith. “This (Fund) sounds like a tremendous plan. Hopefully we’ll have a good day and a good crowd.”

 Several events will be staged in conjunction with Sunday’s racing card to raise money on Von Rosen’s behalf, some of them on the main floor of the grandstand and others in the surrounding outdoor area. Wrist-bands bearing Von Rosen’s initials have been sold on the premises for some time and will be available again today. Dunk tank opportunities featuring several race-track celebrities are available. Pool noodles can be purchased for use by youngsters during stick-horse races later in the day. Photo selfies can be taken with your favorite rider for a donation, and a silent auction, featuring a variety of donated items, is being conducted on the first floor of the grandstand. A 50cc scooter is being raffled as well.

 The riders themselves will donate $100 from each race they win and solicit matching amounts or more from racing fans, trainers and other horsemen.

 Keith has been in contact on Facebook with Von Rosen, keeping her abreast of local news. Von Rosen was moved to the Craig Rehabilitation Center in Denver after successive surgeries in Phoenix following the accident and later she returned to Germany, where her parents reside, for additional care. 

 Recently, she has been receiving spinal treatments in Puerto Rico.

 “Her grit and guts are truly brilliant,” said Keith, who was viewing a Facebook photo of her injured colleague earlier in the week. “There was a picture on there of her on the beach, on her knees in the shallow end of the water. She’s absolutely gritty.”

 Keith, in return, provided Von Rosen with an update of the news at Canterbury and the auction being staged on her behalf.

 Von Rosen is not the first Canterbury Park regular to sustain crippling injuries on the racetrack. Three-time Quarter Horse riding champion Tad Leggett was paralyzed a few years ago in a riding accident and, like Von Rosen, has been confined to a wheelchair since.

 Injuries such as theirs and worse are not uncommon in racing. Last week an exercise rider at Woodbine Racetrack in Toronto was killed when the horse he was riding suffered an apparent heart attack.

 Stevens, too, had seen the picture of Von Rosen on her knees in the Caribbean water and was amazed. “She’s very determined and she’s a tough, tough lady,” he said. “Minnesota was always the top state in donations for the Don MacBeth Fund. I really think there will be a good turnout for Anne, too.”

 Anne and many of her former colleagues at Canterbury are betting on it.

by Jim Wells

Anne Von Rosen begins rehabilitation in Denver

Anne Von Rosen 03-5-14

There is a branch of the John C. Lincoln Hospital chain located on Dunlap Avenue in a residential section of Phoenix. Just a couple of blocks down the street are well manicured and attended properties devoted to llamas and horses, properties grandfathered into this section of the city.

On this particular Saturday morning neighborhood children have attracted the attention of the llamas with treats and are attempting to pet them through the fencing. Down the street is Sunnyslope High School, whose students from a former graduating class (it is widely believed) are responsible for the large white S emblazoned on the foothill overlooking John C. Lincoln.

A block away on this usually busy street a family is staging its version of a Saturday morning garage sale with household items displayed on the sidewalk in front of their house. All in all, this portion of Dunlap Ave. presents a peaceful setting, quiet and undisturbed, in stark contrast to what takes place within the walls of the building down the street.

Visitors to the ICU Unit at John C. Lincoln having been coming and going the last few days, paying their respects to the woman in room 291, the woman with the German name, the black and blue, bruised eyes and a voice that crackles with pain and wheezes when she attempts to talk.

The occupant of this room is Anne Von Rosen, a jockey who was transported here three days earlier fighting for her life after a horse fell on her following a race at Turf Paradise Race Track four miles or so north of the hospital. In the time since she has undergone two invasive surgeries, the first to save her life, the second to enable her to sit upright in the wheelchair she will occupy for the remainder of her life _ barring a miracle or a breakthrough of some unknown kind attributable to nothing more than the spunk and resolve of this fiercely determined woman.

Standing at her bedside as he has most of each day since arriving from Germany is Juergen Von Rosen, a medical doctor and Anne’s father. The two of them expect Anne’s brother Martin, an oncologist, to arrive from Germany as well within a couple of days.

A horse trainer from Turf Paradise is saying his goodbye as another visitor arrives, parting with words Anne has heard from countless others throughout the week. “If there’s anything you need, anything at all, just let me know, sweetheart,” he says.

A soft smile crosses her face briefly as she recognizes another visitor arriving to take the place of the one departing. It has been like this each day since the accident. The visitors are well received and appreciated but have taken a toll as well, requiring energy from Von Rosen she could better use for recovery. Her spinal cord was severed when the horse unexpectedly and inexplicably dropped to the ground after finishing the race. In a reversal of many other such instances at the race track, the horse was fine. It was the rider who was severely injured.

Her accident has taken a toll, too, on the backside at Turf Paradise, on the horsemen and colleagues who know her, many of them regulars at Canterbury Park, as has been Von Rosen.

Every rider knows the risks each time he or she mounts a thoroughbred, or in Von Rosen’s case in this instance a quarter horse. Riding a 1,200 animal at 30 to 35 mph shoulder to shoulder with other riders and horses carries with it inherent danger, possible injury and worse. Yet they race on, these jockeys, card after card, race after race, dismissing the fears and dread that are presented front and center each time one of their own goes down, as Von Rosen did.

Von Rosen has since left Phoenix. Last Thursday she was taken to the Craig Rehabilitation Center in Denver, the same place that treated the late Christopher Reeve following a horse accident that left him paralyzed and Tad Leggett, a three-time quarter horse riding champion at Canterbury Park.

“She was very excited about getting to go (to Denver),” said Turf Paradise chaplain John Shoemaker. “She has been pretty overwhelmed with the support of the racing community. She had two gift bags full of cards and letters from all over the world.”

Shoemaker also said that Von Rosen’s mother and father, who returned home after his time in Phoenix, are scheduled to arrive in Denver from Germany on April 6.

A fund has been established through Canterbury Park and another through the chaplaincy at Turf Paradise to benefit Von Rosen and help defray the prohibitive costs of care already received and yet to come.

“She’s doing well, looks good and her spirits are as good as ever. She’s basically off the pain medicine and is breathing good,” said Troy Bainum, Von Rosen’s agent. “She expects to be in Denver about three months.”

Bainum said that a benefit at nearby nightclub in Phoenix was well attended and that riders and others at Turf Paradise continue to sell bracelets with Anne’s initials to help as well.

“She was very excited to start rehab the day before she left here,” said Bainum. In the days since the accident, Von Rosen has slipped out of fourth place in the rider standings at the Phoenix track, where she had 54 wins for the meet.

Now she has started the grueling process of trying to regain what she can of her lower body strength, a process to which she is entirely dedicated according to friends.

Even in the painful condition she was in the day a visitor left her room at John C. Lincoln one quiet Saturday morning last month, Von Rosen managed to make a promise. “Tell everybody up in Minnesota that I’ll see them this summer,” she said.

by Jim Wells

Update on Anne Von Rosen

tup

Jockey Anne Von Rosen underwent seven hours of surgery on Thursday as doctors continued to treat her following a riding accident on Tuesday at Turf Paradise in Phoenix.

Doctors reportedly were pleased with the surgery and hopeful that it will restore Von Rosen’s ability to sit upright. They are not as hopeful at restoring Von Rosen’s ability to walk again, although reportedly she has enough hope to go around for them and everyone else around her. Those who have seen her say she has a cheerful and optimistic attitude.

 A fund has been set up for her benefit through the chaplaincy at Turf Paradise in Phoenix. Donations can been sent on her behalf to RTCA, Anne Rosen, at Turf Paradise, 1501 West Bell Road, Phoenix, Az., 85023.

 “Doctors said they were quite pleased after the surgery,” said John Shoemaker, the chaplain at Turf Paradise. “Her dad seemed happy, too.”

 Von Rosen’s father flew to Phoenix from his home in Germany where he is a homeopathic doctor and has been at his daughter’s bedside the last two days. Von Rosen has a brother who is an oncologist. He plans to be in Phoenix on Monday.

 Von Rosen was injured in a quarter horse race that opened the card on Tuesday after crossing the wire second. Her horse fell on top of her an instant later, pinning her beneath him. Von Rosen was taken to John C. Lincoln Hospital where doctors performed immediate surgery preceding the one she underwent on Thursday.

 Von Rosen has ridden on and off at Canterbury Park the last decade or so and is well known in the Twin Cities as well as in Phoenix.

 A person’s chances of regaining the use of their lower body following an acccident such as Von Rosen’s are considered very slim, yet she has indicated to visitors that she fully intends to walk again. “She’s very determined and optimistic,” said Shoemaker.

by JIM WELLS

Anne Von Rosen Injured at Turf Paradise

von rosen

A somber mood enveloped the backside at Turf Paradise in Phoenix on Wednesday morning. Despite bright, sunny skies and a warm, pleasant atmosphere, grief permeated the conversations of riders, agents and horsemen. The racing community there was coming to grips with one of the cruel realities of their sport.

One of their own had been struck down and the immediate reports were devastating. Anne Von Rosen, who has ridden on and off the past few summers at Canterbury Park, had been taken by ambulance from the track after a horrific accident in the first race that severed her spinal cord.

Von Rosen was on a quarter horse named Panchita Bonita in a 400-yard race and finished second. Just steps beyond the finish line, Panchita Bonita inexplicably went down _ some observers suspected heat stroke even though it wasn’t that warm _ and landed on Von Rosen, trapping her underneath.

Von Rosen was taken to John C. Lincoln Hospital in Phoenix where she was diagnosed with a severed spinal cord and underwent surgery later that day. Immediate reports indicated a life and death situation.

The immediate news was sobering. “It gives you such a sick feeling to hear that,” said trainer Doug Oliver, a regular trainer and former training champion at Canterbury. “It’s really terrible news.”

The backside heard various reports but many of them were consistent. The news from John C. Lincoln indicated that Von Rosen was fortunate to be alive, would need another surgery, possibly Friday, simply to enable her to sit upright in a wheelchair. Immediate reports indicated she would not walk again.

Rider Scott Stevens, trainer Robertino Diodoro, jockey agent Chad Anderson in addition to Oliver responded with grim remarks when the subject was broached.

 “Something like this doesn’t happen very often,” said Oliver, “but when it does it’s a hard blow.”

Von Rosen was having a successful meet. She was fourth in the standings with 54 wins behind Jorge Carreno, Stevens and Geovanni Franco.

 Trainer Vic Hanson, who sponsored Von Rosen when she came to the U.S. from Germany a decade ago, was stunned. “That’s absolutely terrible news,” he said while en route to Remington Park. “I’m going to try to get there to see her.”

UPDATE from Minnesota HBPA: An account has been set up at Voyager Bank in Shakopee for Anne. There will also be a benefit fund raiser for her once the race meet begins. In the meantime, please keep her in your prayers!!

Voyager Bank
500 Marschall Rd
Shakopee, MN 55379

Checks can be sent “For the Benefit of Anne VonRosen”.

by Jim Wells